Posts for 2005

Beyond Locative Media

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Marc Tuters and I recently completed a draft of an essay for Leonardo and thought we should share it with you. In true netPublics fashion, we wrote the essay collaboratively on Writely.

Abstract:

Locative Media has been attacked for being too eager to appeal to commercial interests as well as for its reliance on the Cartesian mapping systems and the United States military-controlled Global Positioning System. If these critiques are well-founded, they also nostalgic, invoking a notion of art as autonomous from the circuits of mass communication technologies. This essay begins with a survey of the development of Locative Media and its distancing from Net Art, looks at some of the critiques launched against Locative Media, discusses how Locative Media may address these critiques, and explores possible futures for how the field might develop.

Read more at the netpublics site.

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This article, by Kazys Varnelis (of AUDC) and Marc Tuters references some recent, and older, Rhizome threads.

Originally posted on varnelis.net - network culture by Rhizome


Call For Participation - UFVA Conference New Media Exhibition

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Juliet Davis:

UNIVERSITY FILM & VIDEO ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE
August 1-5, 2006
Chapman University
Orange, California
www.ufva.org

CALL FOR NEW MEDIA EXHIBITION SUBMISSIONS

SUBMISSIONS DUE: February 15, 2006

1) Application Form
.pdf: http://www.ufva.org/NewMediaForm2006.pdf
.doc: http://www.ufva.org/NewMediaForm2006.doc

2) Any additional project documentation needed for consideration (for example, CD-ROM, DVD, JPEGS—no slides, please).

3) Participation in the program requires active membership in the UFVA and pre-registration for the conference.

NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE: Early May

SEND SUBMISSIONS TO:

Juliet Davis
Dept. of Communication
University of Tampa
401 West Kennedy Blvd. Box 106-F
Tampa, FL 33606
phone: 727.418.8511
fax: 813-253-6246
julietdavis@tampabay.rr.com

QUESTIONS? Contact Juliet Davis at Juliet.davis@ut.edu or info@julietdavis.com.


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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Juliet Davis


The shiwiars project II

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The shiwiars project:
http://www.theshiwiarsproject.org

After the installation shown at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris from november 4 to 20 2005, another version of this project will be shown on next month at the Art Gallery of Knoxville.
I have the pleasure to quote the press release hereafter:

JANUARY 1 - 25, 2006
———————————-

The Art Gallery of Knoxville presents an investigation into:
«Global Groove» (Nation Building as Art):

Sarawut Chutiwongpeti, Valéry Grancher, CM von Hausswolff & Leif
Elggren, Gordon Matta-Clark, Phill Niblock, Superflex (with a further
discussion of work by Nam June Paik)

The Art Gallery of Knoxville is dedicated to the discussion of new and
emerging Art. Video screenings and open discussion every Wednesday at
7pm. Monthly exhibitions feature the work of international artists
working in all media.

http://www.theartgalleryofknoxville.com

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Originally posted on WiFi-ArT.com by Iggy


and speaking of eKapa

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Here’s another review of the conference, sent by a friend who agreed I could re-post:

Rules of Engagement - a few notes from the eKapa Sessions

Cape Town 04 - 06 December 2005, Jose Ferreira

[....]The role of these sessions was to solicit interest in a major question. How do we re-contextualise art practice and our cultural institutions as meaningful ciphers for people in this country, especially after the erroneous structures created by apartheid? [....] The first day opened with minister Pallo Jordan speaking about the endeavour of Arts and Culture to address the "hidden genius" of people in this country. His words echoed a sentiment that was present throughout the gathering, which is to re-locate art practice within a global, African context. [....] This is a topic that was close to everyone attending, that somehow artists from ‘developing’ continents want to be represented within new systems, new cultural institutions, and ones that don’t reinforce stereotype, mimicry and fetishism of their work. It is an intensely political debate as the role of the museum too is essentially a western canon of representation, very lucidly argued by Sylvester Ogbechie, therefore any art project of significance must take into account a deep interrogation of the museum as a "pre-eminent signifier of western power". [...]

There was a lot of talk about "informal networks", and the ability to integrate systems of art practice that may not be expected or established genres into the public domain. This term, borrowed from Fritjof Capra’s book Hidden Connections is not new but perhaps its application to art practise and curatorship is. Perhaps by engaging with a place over time it is possible to initiate projects that are more meaningful to the cultures that have to digest them. Capra writes, "With the new information and communication technologies, social networks have ...

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There's a LOT more to this thoughtful review, at the link...

Originally posted on jameswagner.com by james


Knit graffiti

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knitta: bombing the neighborhood with fresh, aerosol-free knit graff!

A Houston press article on Montrose's craftiest taggers is getting a lot of play online as it interviews two members of the knitta crew:

"We're taking graffiti and making it warm, fuzzy and more acceptable," says AKrylik.

"It's considerate to the victim," says Poly. "If they don't like it, they can just unbutton it."

"It's not vandalism," adds AKrylik. "I almost wish there was a little more permanency to it, that it was a little harder to remove."

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This is a great holiday gift for any city! Makes me feel all warm and cozy inside.

Originally posted on Space and Culture by Anne


Artcontext Calendar 2006 - Panel Junction

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Lauren Cornell
:

Hi,

Andy Deck has just finished a calendar that complements his Panel Junction project (http://artcontext.org/act/05/panel/). Could be a nice gift for the holidays for those who prefer to receive net art over, say, a new pair of socks :)

http://artcontext.org/calendar

All best,
Lauren

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Lauren Cornell


Superlowrez at vertexList

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bitstreams

Juan Downey and Fred Pitts, Against Shadows, 1968


Jude Tallichet EMPR

Jude Tallichet, EMPR, 2005, on view in the Superlowrez exhibit at vertexList in Brooklyn.


"Superlowrez" is an editioned series of Jim Campbell-like, or ahem, Downey-and-Pitts-like LED boxes. The 8 invited artists had the next-to-impossible task of distinguishing themselves as unique creative entities with a pallette consisting solely of a 12 X 14 pixel matrix, 8 levels of brightness for each pixel, and 1984 frames of animation (what each lightbox's chip holds). One of the more phallo-logo-ideographically punchy works, Tallichet's EMPR, is based on Warhol's Empire State Building film. The rest tended to blur together in the viewer's mind--in fact the 8 boxes looked like a rather handsome (if derivative) solo show. Lots of Space Invader-y looking stuff, as you might gather.

The sheer insurmountability and inadvertent bubble-popping anti-pretentiousness of the project reminded me of a piece from the '80s--PM Summer's 100 Photographers (Aborted). In that work, Summer gave a polaroid SX-70 camera to a range of different photographers--artists, art directors, photojournalists, product photographers, paparazzi--and asked them to photograph a small locked wooden box with a slot in the top. The polaroid was dropped in the slot and at the end of the project, the photos were removed and exhibited in a grid with no indication of authorship. It was amusing and sad to see how everyone struggled to be "original" with such a limited set of parameters: shooting the box from the ground looking up (check--several), shooting it blurry (bunch of those), extreme closeups (you bet), all black, all white, and not very many more strategems. Sorry to cast the pall of despair on the vertexList project, but I found the sociology, and the way the boxes got fractionally more interesting through learning the anecdotes and back ...

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Originally posted on Tom Moody by tom moody


Naked bandit/here, not here/white sovereign

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Global information technologies are producing new territorial principles of order and new logics of space, as well as constituting forms of transnational power and sovereignty. They have created zones in which legal status can be suspended, in which citizenship is invalidated, in which the assumption of innocence is thrown away.

OrleansInstall7_300.jpg

Naked bandit/here, not here/white sovereign allows visitors to symbolically intervene in the process.

In the installation, an autonomous flying robot (a helium filled blimp)controls and attacks black balloons, the naked bandits, without any technical control devices, which are detained and kept captive, floating in space. They serve as well as targets and as orientation and navigation patterns for the sovereign robotic logics characterized by processes of zoning, scanning, filtering, profiling, detecting and targeting. Visitors can contaminate the logics of this autonomous flight machinery through constructing obstacles in space via their physical presence (serving as additional targets) and making the sovereign space more and more un-navigable.

But my favourite work by Knowbotic Research has to be Minds of Concern: Breaking News which investigates the borders of what is and what is not legal in the (US) public domain after patriot act, and they try to seek out the areas of friction between an active construction of the public domain, the expansive US legal system.

ny1490.jpg

Visitors can select Minds of Concern —groups, artistic media activists, movements, or NGOs such as Oxfam, Freedom from Debt Coalition, or COSATU— that are engaged in critical global activities inside our networked society. By clicking a name in this list —either in the installation or on the website, visitors trigger a set of network processes that investigate the security conditions of a different server and evaluate whether it is secure or open to hacking attacks. The software processes are transformed and externalized through light ...

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Superlowrez at vertexList

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bitstreams

Juan Downey and Fred Pitts, Against Shadows, 1968


Jude Tallichet EMPR

Jude Tallichet, EMPR, 2005, on view in the Superlowrez exhibit at vertexList in Brooklyn.


"Superlowrez" is an editioned series of Jim Campbell-like, or ahem, Downey-and-Pitts-like LED boxes. The 8 invited artists had the next-to-impossible task of distinguishing themselves as unique creative entities with a pallette consisting solely of a 12 X 14 pixel matrix, 8 levels of brightness for each pixel, and 1984 frames of animation (what each lightbox's chip holds). One of the more phallo-logo-ideographically punchy works, Tallichet's EMPR, is based on Warhol's Empire State Building film. The rest tended to blur together in the viewer's mind--in fact the 8 boxes looked like a rather handsome (if derivative) solo show. Lots of Space Invader-y looking stuff, as you might gather.

The sheer insurmountability and inadvertent bubble-popping anti-pretentiousness of the project reminded me of a piece from the '80s--PM Summer's 100 Photographers (Aborted). In that work, Summer gave a polaroid SX-70 camera to a range of different photographers--artists, art directors, photojournalists, product photographers, paparazzi--and asked them to photograph a small locked wooden box with a slot in the top. The polaroid was dropped in the slot and at the end of the project, the photos were removed and exhibited in a grid with no indication of authorship. It was amusing and sad to see how everyone struggled to be "original" with such a limited set of parameters: shooting the box from the ground looking up (check--several), shooting it blurry (bunch of those), extreme closeups (you bet), all black, all white, and not very many more strategems. Sorry to cast the pall of despair on the vertexList project, but I found the sociology, and the way the boxes got fractionally more interesting through learning the anecdotes and back ...

MORE »

Originally posted on Tom Moody by tom moody


google zeitgeist 2005

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googlezeitgeist.jpg


A yearly study of several significant world events derived from the aggregation of billions of search queries people type into Google, showing human curiosity, thirst for news, & perhaps even basic desires. now in a very outspoken (but minimalistic) data visualization style. See also google search activity map for an animated time-based geographical world view of those billions of user queries. [google.com]

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Originally posted on information aesthetics by infosthetics