Posts for 2005

Easy Listening & moiMovies - Marisa Olson

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Easy Listening, Marisa Olson
Easy Listening (2005, 4.2MB)

At once a performance and performance-documentation, this video grew out of the admission that much of Olson’s pop music-obsessed performance art work can be boiled down to a process of watching her listen to (and be influenced by) music. The easy way out, then, would be this—to listen to music in front of people. Viewers were told that Olson was listening to those MP3’s in her collection that were labeled “easy listening.

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Originally posted on DVblog by marisa


Got GPS?

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There probably isn’t much earthly ground left unmapped at this point, especially given the ubiquity of new tools and mobile devices. If new territories aren’t driving contemporary cartography, new socio-spatial relationships surely are. Maps may still tell us how to get from points 'A' to 'B,' but they are also being used to tell us where we might eat or get a wifi connection, somewhere in between. Even something as old-fashioned as milk and cheese makes for an interesting mapping adventure. At least it did in the hands of artists Esther Polak and Ieva Auzina, who, together with Riga’s RIXC Center for New Media, followed the production and consumption of Latvian milk through personal narratives and spatial delineations. For their 2005 Golden Nica-winning MILK project, the artists gave GPS devices to people involved in the dairy trade between Latvia and the Netherlands, representing their movements as animated maps, photos, and textual memories on the web. A kind of geographic documentary, MILK conflates the objectivity of mapping with the subjective experiences of economics, politics and, of course, other people. And this MILK is perfectly safe for lactose-intolerant viewers. -Ryan Griffis

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CULTURETV News

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Marjan van Mourik:

Happy Christmas from CULTURETV http://www.culturetv.tv

Well despite the holidays, the show must go on. So we present to You this week a range of art activities and forms. From gallery exhibitions to urban art and from a fake movie to an interactive installation.

Deitch Projects specializes in producing ambitious projects by contemporary artists. Since opening with a performance by Vanessa Beecroft in January 1996, the gallery has presented over one hundred and twenty solo exhibitions and projects, twelve thematic exhibitions, and numerous public events[...]

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Marjan van Mourik


So what's a hacker, then?

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Pretty stimulating introduction speech by Tim Pritlove this morning at the 22 Computer Chaos Congress. I´ll write it down for my mum and many many friends who think that hackers are smelly, dangerous and wear skull rings on every finger.

troicade800x600.jpg

Here you go:

Let´s fight the distorted image of the hacker by listing what hackers are not:
- we are not criminals. Hacking is about freedom, understanding the --more and more filled with technologies-- world outside,
- we are not all-mighty uber-geeks, we are people who explore, who are curious, want to go into things,
- we´re not there to fix your Windows box,
- we´re not to be ignored. Hackers have a voice.

What hackers are:
- we are concerned. Concerned about how the world works and try to see how to make it work in a better way,
- we are commited to do that,

The first congress was held 22 years ago by a small group of people who had the feeling that computers would have such a huge impact on our lives. It was in Hamburg in 1984. Yes, 1984, icon of surveillance and opression. Even in Germany today laws are voted that make these issues more present than ever. That´s a reason why the theme of this year is Private investigations.

Check their weblog for more.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Canadian copyright watch blog

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<p><a href="http://www.lessig.org/blog/archives/003181.shtml">A lot of smart Intellectual Property types have started a blog about copyright</a> — the title says it all: <q><a href="http://www.copyrightwatch.ca/">Copyrightwatch.ca</a>: Debunking copyright myths, one post at a time.</q> Myths or not, there’s lots of very thoughtful stuff there, writes <a href="http://www.lessig.org/blog/">Lawrence Lessig</a>. It bills itself as <q>Canada’s home for common sense and the straight goods on digital copyright law. This blog is supported by a team of academics, public interest advocates, and creators concerned that copyright serve the interests of ordinary Canadians.</q> [<a href="http://www.lessig.org/blog/">Lessig Blog</a>] </p>

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Originally posted on unmediated by Cinema Minima::Socrates Maupin


French Attempt to Legalize File Sharing

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By

I was down at the sumptuous French National Assembly (A building that looks like a Greek temple from the outside and a livingroom overdosed with red velvet on the inside) yesterday because a group of latenight legislators this week amended a bill to include a global tax for people wishing to share files over the Internet.

Once a user (an "internaut" in French) has paid the fee, that internaut is free to share music or movies on the basis that they are for personal use only.

Result: Hey presto! Kazaa would suddenly be legal in France. What is considered piracy in other parts of the world would be available here in France.

Also: Artists would recieve payouts from the tax money raised (Systems for copyright taxation are not unusual in Europe. Germany, for example, imposes a 12 euro copyright levy on the sale of each personal computer purchased.)

Needless to say, the music and movie industry people were not terribly pleased.
(...)

If this blog-ization of the article is not clear, check out the full IHT version here.

Which arguments have the most merit and can creative industries survive in the face of peer-to-peer?

Comment - TrackBack

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Originally posted on Joi Ito's Web by Rhizome


Chaos Computer Club hacker con begins in Berlin

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Xeni Jardin: Jacob Appelbaum says,

On Tuesday, the 22nd Chaos Communication Congress begins -- it runs from December 27th to the 30th, and takes place at the Berliner Congress Center in Alexander Platz in Berlin. Joi Ito is giving the keynote (Link). I'm also speaking (Link). If you're in Berlin and you're interested in society, technology, the past, present or future, this is the place to be!

Link to event info.

Photo: outside the Chaos con (also known as 22c3) in Berlin, shot by Jacob. Flickr tags for more of his photos from the event: 22c3 and ccc.

Reader comment: Cory Ondrejka says,

I'll be speaking at 22c3 as well (Link). Should be an amazing conference, plus I'll be living on the bleeding edge with the first public demo of the Second Life client running on Linux.

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Originally posted on Boing Boing by Xeni Jardin


33 Questions per Minute by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

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Marjan van Mourik:

SPOTS, the media installation at Potsdamer Platz,Berlin. presents 33 Questions per Minute by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

Berlin, Park Kolonnaden at Potsdamer Platz, 12.12.2005:

* Questions from passers-by become part of an interactive work of art
* 33 Questions per Minute by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, until 8 January 2006

What is life? Who am I? Where do we come from, and where do we go? If you’ve ever wanted to ask a deeply personal question on a gigantic media facade, then as from 13 December 2005 you can by taking part in the interactive art project 33 Questions per Minute (33QPM), Relational Architecture 5 by Mexican-Canadian artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer. Passers-by can type whatever questions are occupying them into a terminal that is installed within viewing distance of the SPOTS light and media facade.

SPOTS is one of the largest light and media installations in the world and is integrated into the facade of Potsdamer Platz 10. As the name suggests, 33QPM will display 33 questions each minute. If no question has been typed in at the terminal, the computer generates the questions itself from a virtually limitless source of sentence fragments, combining human curiosity with purely mechanical, often meaningless strings of words. The software, which Rafael Lozano-Hemmer developed himself, can generate 55 billions questions in German, English and Spanish. It would take 3,000 years to output all the possible question combinations. Lozano-Hemmer: “33QPM is a project that represents mechanical irony. Inexhaustible grammatical algorithms make a romantic and hopeless attempt to ask questions that have never been asked before. The words are combined electronically and form random links between totally disparate levels of experience.

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Originally posted on Rhizome.org Raw by Marjan van Mourik


See Art on Cellphone

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See Art on Cellphone

Start Mobile is making art available for cellphones (North America carriers only) where you can buy ‘em from their website. The art here feature works of many street art icons and tons of other underground/emerging visual artists… and what’s more, it’s affordable — at $1.99 each, you’d run out of space on your phat new 3G phone even before you’re done browsing the catalogue.

Start Mobile is a project by START SOMA gallery in San Francisco.

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Originally posted on see art / make art by ann


The Art of the Gamer

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Is the Gamecube the new white cube? New York's Pace Wildenstein Gallery wants to know. Their show, Breaking and Entering: Art and the Video Game, experiments with what can happen when you turn an art gallery into an inhabitable gamespace. 'Products of a generation whose cultural habits and memory have been very much formed by interactive experience, [the artists] construct their own reality out of the detritus of imagination,' writes curator Patricia Hughes. The show celebrates the creative versatility of digital media, while simultaneously delving into the very nature of play: Brody Condon’s 'DeResFX.Kill,' sees a cultural icon (Elvis) deployed as the artist’s amenable object; Eddo Stern’s 'Deathstar' offers an interpretation of video gaming as an expression of international aggression; and JODI’s life-size quad screen installation examines gaming as an index of the creative process itself. B&E; runs through January 28. Break into it. - Peggy MacKinnon

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