Posts for 2004

Sometimes It's a Text and Image World

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While some netizens may find repugnant the idea of anything communicated over the web lying archived under glass, Mexican artist Alberto Guedea's curatorial effort, Re:, promises to be an interesting jaunt into cross-platform migration. Guedea has collected specimens of e-mail art from artists all over the world and will show them in the Access Artist Run Center of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, from January 24 to February 14, 2004. While there were no thematic or conceptual parameters placed on the contents of the e-mails, only those who submitted work in the form of text and image (as opposed to Flash or executables) will be represented: the e-mails will be shown offline, as works on paper. --Lewis LaCook

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It's Been Almost A Month Since We Asked You This...

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Do you value Net Art News? Do you appreciate the research and thinking that go into its writing? We hope you prize art discourse and that you will make a contribution to Rhizome that reflects your pro-art values. Rhizome needs your support today, since we're hoping to raise $37,000 by February 1, 2004. With less than two weeks to go, we are about halfway there. Give $5 or more and you will be eligible for an individual membership and can subscribe to lists such as Rhizome RAW, RARE, and DIGEST. Members also have the opportunity to submit proposals for Rhizome Net Art Commissions (see the Commissions page for details). And, as an added bonus, those who give more than $15 will receive a 10-20% discount in the New Museum of Contemporary Art's Online Store. Buy books, art editions, gifts, jewelry, and children's merchandise at a discount and help Rhizome at the same time! Check out the Online Store here: http://www.newmuseum.org/comersus/store/comersus_dynamicIndex.asp. Thank you for considering this request. -- Rhizome.org

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I'm Rubber, You're Glue...

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The question 'what makes art 'Art'?' has been asked by critics, historians, artists, philosophers, and, well, probably just about everyone else. So, given the increasing visibility of art made for the net, it should be no surprise that the same curious ranks are asking 'what is Net Art?' The first issue of a Flash-based magazine called 'Gluebalize' posed this question to a number of international artists, who in turn responded through artworks and interviews. Responses vary widely in content and form, from interactive databases to Flash animations and scans of drawings. Gluebalize is one part of 'Blogwork,' an ongoing project initiated by artist and writer Lorenzo Miglioli for the 2003 Venice Biennale. Miglioli, offers a short and sweet answer to the Net Art question: 'the network is the artwork.' Now that whole caper has been resolved, can we move on to real questions such as 'Is 'Curating' Art?' -Ryan Griffis

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Play Hard!

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Ever wanted to run around a 3D maze made from your fingerprint? Or learn how to build a wi-fi antenna from your favorite can of soup? Enter Play Shop, an 'open-access' laboratory running from this Saturday, January 17 through April 4, at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. The brainchild of FutureFarmers' Amy Franceschini, Play Shop's founding principle is to subvert the role of technology through artistic interventions and workshops. 'I am hoping Play Shop can be a starter seed space where people can meet informally to exchange, collaborate and explore creative uses of technology,' she explains. Along with plenty of on-site tinkering, Play Shop's events include Fur, the makers of PainStation, and the student-run group Artech with Richard Mortimer Humphrey and Scott Snibbe. If that's not enough, Yerba Beuna's museum is mounting the exhibition 'Bang the Machine: Computer Gaming Art and Artifacts,' with work by artists such as Brody Condon, Paul Johnson, Shelley Eshkar and Paul Kaiser. So stop by with a project, an idea to change the world, or just an open mind. You won't be disappointed. --Jonah Brucker-Cohen

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Applets of Endearment

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New York's Whitney Museum of American Art is currently featuring a glimpse into American net artist Ken Perlin's sketchbook. Perlin showcases many ideas via the Whitney's user-friendly portal

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Dive In

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Considering all the rhetoric that has been produced about information technologies and their impact on global culture, it's easy to feel exhausted, or at the very least tired, by the prospect of more internet discourse. If you're not suffering from this critical fatigue, Deep Sites (Thames & Hudson, 2003), a new book by design critic Max Bruinsma, should be added to your reading list. Deep Sites energetically discusses a plethora of web sites within a framework of five categories of innovation: interface, typography, animation, community and authoring. Each category includes a range of types -- from web art to corporate sites to blogs -- arguing that they are all taking us somewhere new and potentially liberating. Bruinsma seems to think that design can help us swim, rather than flail, as we move into the techno-future. For those wanting a preview, the author's personal web site provides texts in English and Dutch as well as links to the sites featured in the book. - Ryan Griffis

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Take a Walk to Chiang Mai

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A small, independent new media art nonprofit called 'switch media chiang mai' is holding a festival and conference, 'Pathiharn Electron [Supernatural],' this coming April in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Right now the switch staff is preparing for the events and they are accepting submissions of digital art (until the 31st January), and conference papers and organizational partners (until 15, February). Proposals for installations are especially welcome and as such artists should keep in mind the rich social spaces of the city when organizing ideas: night markets, food stalls, karaoke bars, internet cafes and video arcades. If you can't escape the humdrum aesthetics of your own life to attend Pathiharn Electron [Supernatural], how about becoming part of switch's critical mass by joining their mailing list? Details for all programs on the site. -- Rachel Greene

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Free Domain Names for New Rhizome-Hosting Customers

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Sign up for Rhizome hosting before January 15, 2004, and receive a *FREE* domain name for one year. Provided by the international, well-established, ISP Broadspire, the hosting services are high-quality: for $65 per year Rhizome members can put their sites on a Linux server, with 350MB disk storage space, 1GB data transfer per month, catch-all email forwarding, daily web traffic stats, 1 FTP account, and the capability to host one's own domain name (or use http://rhizome.net/your_account_name). Plus, the hosted can take comfort in knowing they're being active roots in the Rhizome schema, helping the .ORG to be self-sustaining. Details on the site.

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Cream for the Holiday Season

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Last week I received a delightful email update from cream, a group of writers and curators which focuses on 'art in networks' and publishes a web site. The email, entitled 'cream *14*: the Joy of Closure,' contained writings by French artist and writer Frederic Madre, New York-based writer Blackhawk, Dutch critic Josephine Bosma, and a mysterious 'Ms. O.' I especially liked Madre's headlining contribution, a description of ways in which the web seems closed, and Ms. O.'s cryptic autobiography. Two subjective reasons to check out cream; other perhaps more objective allures include the site's comprehensive archive and thorough updates on people and events. Do you know who Saul Albert is? Get creamed. -- Rachel Greene

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