Posts for March 2003

Power to the (Drunk) People

(0)

Roll up your sleeves and warm up your dart-throwing arm. Nottingham-based new media researchers, designers and consultants Suppose are out to prove that net.art is not just for basement-bound loner types. Beginning March 20, a series of 'live events' will attempt to take digital art and new media to the street by opening up public discussions over beer and crisps at Nottingham's Maze pub. The first installment features glitch artist Tony Scott of Beflix.com, Suppose's Edward George and others in an evening loosely illustrating one of net.art's most enduring obsessions: methodologies of automatic art production. Prizes, cheap beer, net.art hotties. Why didn't someone think of this before? -Cinqu

MORE »


Go On (Counter) Strike

(0)

Even before the first round was fired in Atari's 'Combat' (for the 2600 console), war games were established as a driving force in interactive entertainment. Those familiar with the exploitable quirks in the old Atari games know that game intervening was simultaneously established. 'Banner-Strike,' a collaborative effort of the Banner Art Collective and Velvet-Strike, is a contest for innovative 'digital graffiti' that critically addresses the likely war in Iraq. The contest asks for images to be used as on-line banners and Counter-Strike 'sprays.' Deadline is 16 April, 2003. -- Ryan Griffis

MORE »


Dam, Computer Art History!

(0)

It may be hard to focus on computer art these days, but one might enjoy stopping by the Digital Art Museum. The work-in-progress site is currently tied to a physical location in Berlin, and opens those doors this Saturday, 22 March. I like the simple periodizing proposed on the website -- Phase 1: 1956-1986 The Pioneers, Phase 2: 1986-1996 The Paintbox Era, and Phase 3: 1996-2006 The Multimedia Era. Also useful for history buffs: a timeline that includes many seminal, legendary art and technology projects like Robert Rauschenberg and Yvonne Rainer's EAT (Experiments in Art and Technology and the Cybernetic Serendipity show at London's ICA in 1968. There are holes in this history for sure, but what museum claims a complete collection? -- Rachel Greene

MORE »


No Clicks Required

(0)

This hypertext work may win over those who are resigned to hating the genre. Closer to an animation operationally than a branching narrative, Michael Atavar's 'thethingasitis' describes the artist's relation to HTML color pallettes. Detaching and recontextualizing into the foreground what is often a background detail, Atavar celebrates a blue tone native to the web medium. 'thethingasitis' has an emphasis on color, but the engaging personal text that animates over the monochromatic browser field creates two equally pleasant perceptual modes. Go blue! -- Rachel Greene

MORE »


What comes to mind when you hear...

(0)

Raygun, a new work by Victor Liu of 'Children of the Bureaucrats of the Revolution' fame, takes its name from its homophone, Reagan (as in Ronald). Liu has animated an elegantly produced slideshow to Reagan's famous 1982 speech 'The Evil Empire.' Liu layers and repeats images strategically -- making the mimicry of Reagan sometimes lighthearted, sometimes ironic, sometimes disturbing and very serious. One may experience information overload, between the audio and the many images to process, as well as a certain kind of fragmentation -- signifiers rotate very quickly. It's an apt project for these times, perhaps. Java and audio required. -- Rachel Greene

MORE »


Joo Lye Kit?

(0)

Human Capital Software Solutions, a conceptual software project by the Nungu collective and Signwave, Inc., takes on issues of labor, language, and psycho-geographic displacements. Opening with Blondie's song 'Call Me,' the HCSS website ironically offers solutions to problems being faced by Southern entrepreneurs (in this case, Indian) needing cheap and distributed workforces. The Human Capital Software application (beta versions available for Windows and Mac OSs) offers an audio-visual interface that puts users in the role of Indian tele-workers fielding calls from US clients. A result of playing with the software is a kind of interactive 'sound poetry' that derives meaning from the slippages between economic communication and cultural interference. - Ryan Griffis

MORE »


Happening in BC, Canada

(0)

Sunday March 30 at 2 pm PST, the Surrey Art Gallery will host a panel of five artists discussing the general state of technoart, as well as two works of new media art in exhibition, Ground Station by Daniel Jolliffe and Jocelyn Robert, and Catalogue by Kate Armstrong. This latter net-based project Catalogue is the culmination of Armstrong's residency in Surrey, and takes as its subject matter the history of catalogue-based shopping from early Hudson's Bay to Web pop-ups. And while Catalogue is devoted to a sphere of commodification, admission at this promising event is free. -- Rachel Greene

MORE »


Computer Art from Before You Were Born

(0)

Rhizome old-timers will know Joseph Nechvatal, but those who don't should consider researching his work. Nechvatal was a Rhizome regional editor for many years, is based in Paris and New York, and has been making art with computers and writing about technoart since the 80s. Animations, essays, and images of paintings can be accessed on his website, and I recommend Joe Lewis' essay (reprinted from Art in America) on Nechvatal's show at Universal Concepts Unlimited for an overview of recent projects, and Carlo McCormick's review from Artforum in 1988 for a broader history. -- Rachel Greene

MORE »


Time for an Upgrade

(0)

Co-produced by Eyebeam and Yael Kanarek (of Love Letters from a World of Awe fame), The Upgrade is a monthly meeting of new media artists, curators and enthusiasts in New York City. Upgrades are usually informal discussions, and the next one, happening tonight at 7 PM, will take place at Bitforms Gallery where Michael Joaquin Grey will talk about his work. If you can't attend Grey's realtime presentation, check out the Upgrade web archive -- one can find useful summaries and related links covering each event. -- Rachel Greene

MORE »


If You Think Art Looks Weird in a Gallery...

(0)

The Tate Modern is beyond cyber-space, they're in real, outer space. One can see a view from their satellite on their Website, but perhaps more interesting is their recent foray into developing architectural ideas for a future Tate-in-Space. Part of early-stage thinking about the space museum included a student architectural competition, and the judges have recently awarded several prizes. Entries are varied: one sees a museum that looks like a donut, another that looks like a stack of cards mid-shuffle. There are also models of these potential art-venues to download and assemble. Gravity not included. -- Rachel Greene

MORE »