Posts for February 2003

Why Robots Paint

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A talent show with a difference takes place in July at EYEBEAM Gallery, NYC. ArtBots: The Robot Talent Show celebrates robotic art and art-making robots. The first ArtBots was held last year, and showcased the work of robot musicians, visual artists and performers. Prizes were awarded to the People's Choice (David Webber and AO2000) and the Robots' Choice (Stefan Prosky and SYMET Studio). The deadline for this year's show is March 1, and the rules are simple: if you think it's a robot, and you think it's making art, it's eligible. Fifteen entries will be selected for presentation at the two-day event. - Helen Varley Jamieson

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Oh Yeah! The War on War is in the House!

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Comics have a long tradition of functioning as a release for various forms of anxiety-ridden satire. 'Get Your War On,' an online comic strip series by temp worker/artist/musician David Rees, continues that tradition. Since creating the first eight strips in the series and posting them to his web site on October 9, 2001, over eight million people have accessed the project. Why has GYWO had such appeal? Fellow cartoonist, Tom Tomorrow asserts that in their continuing rants and sarcastic questions, GYWO

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Cyber-Feminism is the Issue

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Cyberfeminism is the theme of the current issue of ArtWomen, an online journal of feminist art. Contributing writers are Carolyn Guertin, Maria Fernandez, Cindy Gabriela Flores and the cyberfeminist cell subRosa, giving four perspectives on the current status of cyberfeminism and art. As well as discussing specific artists and their work, the articles explore race, tactical cyberfeminism, reproductive technologies and Latin American cyberfeminist art. The links accompanying each article and further cyberfeminist links could keep a grrl surfing for weeks. And don't forget to have a look around the rest of the ArtWomen site, which includes an online gallery, news and archives. - Helen Varley Jamieson

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Assignment: Learn to Love and Participate

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'Learning to Love You More' is a DIY web site by artists Miranda July and Harrell Fletcher with a curatorial twist. On the site the duo post art assignments for the general public, cajoling participation by saying: 'Even wild animals love your art.' Those who take on an assignment like 'Re-create a poster you had as a teenager' are included in the online catalogue, but there may be other destinations for completed works. All those who finish Assignment #12 by February 24th will be included in a group presentation at New York's MOMA. Other 'Learning to Love You More' shows are traveling to Bristol, England, and Houston, Texas. -Brooke Singer

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See the Horizon?

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What happens when scientists, artists, theorists and technology converge? The latest issue of the Banff Centre New Media Institute's online magazine, HorizonZero, aims to find out. New issue number 6 is entitled

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The Danish Connection

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The Danish Artnode Foundation is a Copenhagen-based non-profit that has been exhibiting contemporary art online since 1995. Run by artists, Artnode began as an online outlet for visual art and criticism, but soon began supporting works created specifically for the Net - now representing works by over 150 Danish New Media artists. Visitors can view archives of past projects as well as current and ongoing works. Samples of Artnode projects: 'Inserts,' an exhibition of online works and texts by women; '100 Drawings,' pencil drawings of random pages from the Artnode site; 'High Density,' interpretations of interaction vs. art.

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Celling subRosa

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Rosa is a name popular with feminist heroines, which is the reason why it's been adopted by reproducible cyberfeminist cell subRosa. Focussing on biotechnologies and information networks, and their impact on women's bodies, lives, and work, subRosa combines art and activism in campaigns, sneak attacks, publications, media interventions and public forums. Their site details a plethora of actions in various media and locations since 1998. 2003 will see the publication of a book, 'Domain Errors: Cyberfeminist Practices,' on the intersections of cyberfeminism, postcolonial issues and digital technologies. Why is subRosa talked about as a 'reproducible cell?' Well, subRosa invites you to take up the logo and name, and grow your very own subRosa cell as part of this mutating, proactive, feminist network. - Helen Varley Jamieson

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Who's In Control?

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Reality TV programmes like Big Brother have made audiences familiar with voting to influence drama. The 'Tele-Actor' brings this concept to the internet, where an online audience casts votes to control the actions of a wired human being. As each 'election' takes place, you can see the votes come in and change your own vote accordingly. In this way, the Tele-Actor explores issues related to voting, economics, peer pressure, group psychology, market behaviour, and how trends spread. 'How do people interact and co-operate in social settings? How does applause or laughter ripple across a theatre? How do riots start?' The next live event takes place on Tuesday 18 February at the opening of Id/Entity: Portraiture in the 21st Century, at San Francisco's Camerawork Gallery and, of course, online. Register now to make your vote count! - Helen Varley Jamieson

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Throw Your Worker a Bone

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MetaPet, produced by Action Tank (artists Natalie Bookchin and Jin Lee), is an online game wherein players who successfully manage other genetically 'enhanced' workers maximize their biotech company's profits. By deciding when to work, reward, feed, exercise, and even administer stimulants and tranquilizers, players/managers impact workers' productivity. To be even more effective, managers can use the tools of surveillance at their disposal, like email and DNA background checks. A tip -- when managers come around to check on your performance, use the 'Boss' button to appear more productive. - Ryan Griffis

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We're Going to the Zoo, Zoo, Zoo

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If a Zootrope was based on the loop, then no prizes for guessing Lewis Lacook's latest work, Zoosemiotics, comprises cyclical cinematic sequences, 9 in fact! Here however Lacook has introduced various levels of interaction described by him as '

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