Posts for 2003

Da Bomb, For Real

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Contemporary net art consumers likely know The Bomb Project by American artist Joy Garnett as a strapping resource for all things nuclear-related. As it happens, Garnett was not the first artist to focus on the web as a means of organizing nuclear-related images, links, and documentation. Dutch artist Akke Wagenaar has recently re-published her 1995 artwork of the same premise, The Hiroshima Project. Comparing the two one notes that web graphics and aesthetics of 1995 next to those of today are akin to apples and oranges. Furthermore, Wagenaar took a more artistic approach to arranging elements of data using hypertext and animation while Garnett approximates a professional web portal replete with high quality, astonishing images. Moving beyond the formal and engaging with the internal content of these grave projects -- detailed and devastating information -- questions multiply and explode. -- Rachel Greene

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Deep ASCII Won't Qualify

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Artists who create moving image art for the internet can enter their work into the Sundance Online Film Festival, which in turn feeds into the (offline) Sundance Film Festival. Open to all formats (e.g. Flash, film, analog/digital video, animation, etc.), entries, due in September 12, must be less than 20 minutes in length, in English or featuring English sub-titles. Starting in December, juries will grant awards across Animation, New Form, Short Form and Gallery genres, and online audiences will vote to distribute other prizes. Two caveats -- there is a submission fee -- and if your work is currently screening online, it's not eligible: Sundance is looking for projects that have not previously been available to the public. I suppose that means hacked dupes of the Matrix won't be in the running. -- Rachel Greene

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Never a Grey Day

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UK based art collective Greyworld have been making captivating public installations in urban space since the late 1980s. Their most recent project, 'The Game' turns London's Jubilee Gardens into an interactive birds-eye-view portrait of horror film director Alfred Hitchcock. Sensitive tiles on the ground trigger sound and imagery based on the proximity of visitors' movements. The space is intended for both interaction and contemplation, although collaboration with other patrons is important in order to realise the work's full impact. Their web site also documents their unique 'layer' installations, wherein sensors embedded in blue carpet-covered tunnels and bridges across the UK create sound environments based on foot traffic. Look around their web site, it's never a grey day. -Jonah Brucker-Cohen

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Do You Speak Hexadecimal?

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If everyone is always telling you to get away from your computer and out into the sun, this year's FILE (Electronic Language International Festival) may be just what you need. Opening in Sao Paulo, Brazil, August 13, and running through the 24th, FILE gives attendees a chance to experience the work of some top artists in the new media art field, including American hypertext artist Michael Joyce, California-based Natalie Bookchin and Briton Simon Biggs. The event, held at Cidade Universit

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If 3 Was 1

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When is winning third place really first? When you win at Third Place Gallery! From now until August 15, upload screenshots and links to your artwork to the site, sponsored by PlayStation 2, and you will be entered into a competition that could win you 2000 Euro and a place at Liljevalchs in Stockholm. Select contributors may also win Sony digital still and video cameras. If you don't feel like entering the competition, browse dazzling contributions from artists such as Briton Jessica Loseby, Canadian Jim Andrews, and French Nicholas Clauss. -Lewis LaCook

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etoy Wants and Needs You

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Swiss-German net art outfit with brand ambition seeks to hire a translator to turn three pages of German copy into English. Beyond linguistic skills, applicants must be able to cope with the 'etoy.LIFESTYLE,' which means tolerating the crew's strict observance of corporate parody and highly regimented behavior. Payment will be issued in the form of $400 of registered etoy.SHARES. If your German is rusty, there are other jobs open with etoy -- Psychiatrist and Pilot have recently been filled, but Private Secretary and Accountant positions are still up for grabs. Not sure if these job announcements reflect an expanding collaborative practice or if they're intended to set the stage for an upcoming mission. Perhaps both? -- Rachel Greene

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Code - The Theme of Ars '03

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Ars Electronica, the Austrian Festival for 'Art, Technology & Society' has been a social and critical staple of the technoart scene for almost 25 years. Founded to support dialogue between industry, the academy, and artists using consumer electronics, video, satellite, and radio, this year the Festival, which takes place in early September, takes as its theme 'Code - The Language of Our Time - CODE = Law, CODE = Art, CODE = Life.' Quite a mouthful, but the slogan denotes a focus on privacy, copyright, media art, and bioinformatics. Online forums are usually a staple of Ars, but this year's web site offers detailed previews of Conferences, Exhibitions, Events, Prizes, and more. Also, the site houses an exhaustive archive of previous Festivals -- however seemingly outdated or idiosyncratic the topics or discussions seem in hindsight, dig deep. Invariably you'll excavate some interesting material. -- Rachel Greene

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1001 Arabian Nights

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Several experimental web designers have begun publish online .pdf or Flash 'magazines.' Layed out like print magazines and published on a regular basis, these zines feature work by various designers. Some Flash magazines have begun incorporating minimalistic animations, like twitching books. The new 'Chaos' issue of thisisamagazine.com pushes this medium one step further by adding randomness. Flip through the issue to enjoy a visual treat, and then revisit 'Chaos' to find the pages entirely re-arranged. The focus now shifts from the designs themselves to the user-manufactured relationships between the designs. Interactive web art? Sure, why not? - Curt Cloninger

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Jam Sessions

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Two artworks well known for draping sexual images across digital surfaces, Shu Lea Cheang's 'Expand' and Zvonka Simcic and Tanja Vujinovic's 'Hardbody' are considered in light of their scores in NetNoise, a new exhibition hosted by CTheory. Organized across three sonic categories -- culture pitch, noise velocity, and sound motion -- NetNoise includes international projects from Briton Simon Biggs, Korean Young Hae Chang Heavy Industries, Japanese artist Kogo, and Australian rubric-innovator Mez, among others. The curatorial premise is explained in depth on the NetNoise site in text and audio formats. You heard it here first. -- Rachel Greene

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Beyond the Horizon of Adobe

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Falling asleep at the Photoshop wheel? Bored by using standard commercial applications to make images or animation? 'Vernacular' may be what the doctor ordered. A new software by American artists Beth Coleman and Howard Goldkrand (known for their music collaborative SoundLab), 'Vernacular,' despite it's nominal nod to language, is a highly visual tool for 'associative data processing.' To compose a project, users drag and drop files (my palette included desktop debris -- assorted images and a PDF file) onto 'Vernacular's' main screen, and then associates them with one another with self-styled categories and colors. The coup de foudre -- users can press play to experience a multimedia, personal, 3D animation. The downside of this indie software is that, at least right now, 'Vernacular' runs only on Mac OSX Jaguar. -- Rachel Greene

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