Posts for July 2002

Online Allies

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Harvey Loves Harvey Takes online courtship to a new level. The site archives and hosts the ideas, projects, boredoms, and fascinations of Matthew Nash and Jason Dean, long distance friends for nine years. Underwriting the WWF spoofs, the album consisting of songs recorded solely via email, the mail art projects and theorizing, are the desires to sustain personal connection and to play with the structures and tools of the technology-obsessed. Who needs Match.com when you can keep up with Harvey Loves Harvey?

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Charting Money and New Media Art

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Finding money to make art has always been tricky business. When the medium is new, materials are pricy, and granting institutions just getting up to speed--as with new media art--funding challenges can be even tougher. A floatational device for those drifting in the technoart/grant waters, Pamela Jennings' report, New Media Art/ New Funding Models, commissioned by the Rockefeller Foundation, investigates money sources for new media art internationally. Jennings interviewed 23 individual artists, organizers, directors, and foundation program officers. The final analysis includes definitions of new media art, innovative new business models for artists, profiles of artists and organizations, and recommendations for action. The report reads like a map, charting the new media art waters -- a helpful tool for technoartists.

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Critical Action

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Think a piece of art totally sucks? Don't just verbally criticize it, physically destroy it! 'Art Crime: A Journal of Modern Iconoclasm' objectively documents 17 notable instances of art vandalism. Crimes range from teenagers attacking Serrano's "Piss Christ" with a hammer to conceptual artists making practical use of Duchamp's famed urinal. Some of the crimes actually prove more interesting than the conceptual works they deface (although I could have done without the projectile vomit on the Mondrian). --Curt Cloninger

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Music to Watch URLs By

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Want a little ambient music with that URL? Next time you're streaming Internet radio while online, consider opening the webPlayer instead. Created by Pete Everett, webPlayer is an application that translates HTML data into musical compositions. You set this audio experience in motion by supplying it URLs. The webPlayer turns the HTML data into numbers via an ASCII-based filter. To generate music out of the numbers, webPlayer utilizes mathematical formulae

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The Future of the Graphic Novel?

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While more and more narrative web sites aim to replicate "cinematic" experiences, Broken Saints aims at the comic book paradigm. This epic 24-part series combines traditional comic elements (think Neil Gaiman, not Archie) with Japanese Anime-inspired Flash animations, music, and sound. While the writing never rises beyond standard comic fare, it's worth checking out this figuration of what could be the future of the graphic novel. -- Eryk Salvaggio

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Man Walks Dog: Details at 10

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In response to the morbid headlines that dominate most national newspapers, typorganism.com presents 'Good News / Bad News,' a news source with a twist. On the left are the usual suspects: bad news headlines and thumbnail images dynamically culled from CNN.com. On the right is the good news: headlines and images uploaded by regular people. Sweetly mundane items such as 'Check Out My New Truck' and 'I Love My Wife' balance disaster-driven, media hype with real life occasion and detail. Upload your own personal scoop while you're there. - Curt Cloninger

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Power to the People

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The Media Deconstruction Kit confronts corporate control of mass media by allowing online viewers to remix and manipulate TV news broadcasts. At least that's what it promises to do -- right now it's just a prototype, the brainchild of 'The US Department of Art & Technology,' a faux-governmental entity developed by artist Randall Packer. The prototype itself is pretty arty, with a mashed-up newsreel soundtrack and visually distorted news images that expose a more elusive type of media distortion. - Curt Cloninger

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File Artist Database

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First they went digital, then they went live. Artists Space, a thirty year-old, non-profit art institution in downtown Manhattan, has always maintained a slide registry of work by emerging or unaffiliated artists called the Artists File. After going digital with the database, Artists Space has recently gone web. Viewing the Artists File is free and joining requires filling out one online form. Users of the File contact artists directly, cutting out the middlemen. Artists Space curators choose one File artist each month for virtual exhibitions on the Artist Space web site. -- Brooke Singer

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Art For Free

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Remember the Free Biennial? Now it has a sequel, Free Manifesta. Artist Sal Randolph organized both events to run alongside exclusive, international art exhibitions, the 2002 Whitney Biennial and Manifesta 4, respectively. The difference being that anyone can participate in Randolph's art exhibitions and the art is free. Currently on view in Frankfurt, Germany and online, Free Manifesta has over 225 free public art projects and more than 70 of these are net, mail, phone, or email-based. Free Manifesta, however, has a twist: Randolph is participating in the curated event, Manifesta 4. Her entry, of course, is Free Manifesta.

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McLuhan Visualized

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_The medium is the message._ _We are living in a global village._ Marshall McLuhan is known for these and hundreds of other pithy soundbites which he called _probes._ Now grungy graphic designer David Carson (of Raygun Magazine fame) has visually interpreted over 400 of these in the aptly named _Book of Probes._ Buy it for the insight or the eye candy. McLuhan would have been happy either way. - Curt Cloninger

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