Maya to Google Earth exporter

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Maya2GoogleEarth is an open-source, cross-platform tool developed at Eyebeam for exporting 3D models from Maya into Google Earth. You can use it to load your own 3D models or you can use it in conjunction with OGLE to capture your in game character and place it into Google Earth. There will be a prize for the first person to make Godzilla attacking Tokyo.

Visit project page

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This project was developed at the Eyebeam Production Studio by Theodore Watson, Cathy Shive and Evan Harper.

Originally posted on Eyebeam reBlog by theo


Food Force on Wired

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It's been a while since Food Force has been launched but people are still talking about it. Now it's the turn of Wired to discuss the game. I must say that when I first saw the description of the article on the news aggregator "Food Force[...] tops the game download charts on Yahoo -- despite being more "edu" than "tainment."

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Originally posted on Water Cooler Games by Rhizome


SVEN Surveillance Video Entertainment Network

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SVEN the Surveillance Video Entertainment Network is a custom computer vision application that tracks pedestrians and detects their characteristics, and a real-time video processing application that receives this information and uses it to generate music-video like visuals from the live camera feed. The resulting video and audio are displayed on a monitor in the public space, interrupting the standard security camera type display each time a potential rock star is detected.
Hmmm now all I need is some way to use that technology into the second generation Bono Probability Positioning System which is under development.

Posted to

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Originally posted on Stunned by Rhizome


Mixed-Reality Party In DC and Second Life

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Jerry23 writes "This Saturday The Happening will bring Second Life to first life. The Electric Sheep Company, a new metaverse developer, has virtually recreated R&B Coffee in Washington DC for use in a mixed-reality party and benefit for the DC art scene and several local nonprofits. Real people will mingle with avatars via realtime video projections in the real and virtual R&B spaces, and MAKE Magazine's Phillip Torrone will be on-hand showing off his homemade Virtual Reality headsets and gloves. The whole world is invited to attend in DC or Second Life, whichever's closer for you." This is just conceptually a weird idea to me.

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Originally posted on Slashdot by CmdrTaco


Public Email Portraits

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Maybe they're a sign of an increasingly homogenous global culture, or maybe they reveal universal responses to contemporary life. Either way, the similarities between the snapshots in Finnish artist Kristofer Paetau's monthly email project, Picturepeople, are nothing short of uncanny. Posting each new message online, Paetau groups together found images from diverse sources that have remarkably similar subjects, from proud fishermen posing with their catches or smoking teenagers smiling for the camera, to kids throwing rocks at tanks and really elaborate fake fingernails. Why do people from different eras, locations, and cultures think such similar moments are worth capturing? The photos give each action a sense of sweeping social, political, or even ritual gravity, but beyond suggesting that an ultimate significance might be there, Paetau is playfully ambiguous about the implications of each set. His investigations are definitely timely though. Just browse a few snapshots on Flickr, and not only do the actions people document start to look similar, but the images also catalog contemporary values, desires, and fears--even if they are a little vague and sometimes ridiculous. - Bill Hanley

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Online visualization of teens breakups

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The Whitney Museum's Artport and the Tate Online have teamed up to commission three web projects. Launching today, Valentine's Day, The Dumpster by Golan Levin with Kamal Nigam and Jonathan Feinberg is an online visualization that depicts a slice through the romantic lives of American teenagers. Using postings extracted from millions of blogs, visitors can surf through tens of thousands of romantic relationships in which one person has "dumped" another.

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The Battle of Algiers (launches Wed 3.1), by Marc Lafia and Fang-Yu Lin, is a continual re-composition of scenes from the seminal 1965 film re-enactment of Gillo Pontecorvo's movie.

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By entering Screening Circle (launches Wed 3.22), by Andy Deck, visitors can compose loops of graphics and affect and edit each other's screens. The pieces, or segments, can be made by one person or by several people and the arrangement of the segments can be haphazard or precise.

Via Flavorpill.

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Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Rhizome Promotion: Hosting With Heart

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What's sweeter than a dozen truffles, on Valentine's Day? The sweet deals Broadspire's offering on hosting! For a low $65 annual payment, Rhizome's beloved host will give you 350MB disk storage, 1GB data transfer a month, POP email, free setup, and daily content back-ups. Broadspire also offers more robust plans for those with higher bandwidth needs. So whether you're looking to splurge on yourself or that someone special in your life, Broadspire will fulfill all your digital desires. Signing up is as easy as saying 'Be Mine' and each mention of Rhizome will drop a dime in our heart-shaped donation box. We'll also share the love by listing your name and URL on our front page. It's a match made in heaven! - Rhizome.org

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Metal Gear creator Hideo Kojima: 'Games Are Not Art'

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<i>"I don't think they're art either, videogames," he said, referring to Roger Ebert's recent commentary on the same subject. "The thing is, art is something that radiates the artist, the person who creates that piece of art. If 100 people walk by and a single person is captivated by whatever that piece radiates, it's art. But videogames aren't trying to capture one person. A videogame should make sure that all 100 people that play that game should enjoy the service provided by that videogame. It's something of a service. It's not art. But I guess the way of providing service with that videogame is an artistic style, a form of art."</i>

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Hmmm.... I used to edit a paper zine called SMAC, for which I once commissioned an essay from Atari-founder Nolan Bushnell on whether video games were art. His answer: no. The issue coincided with SMAC's panel on the same subject, written up here in Wired (where Bushnell explains his position), in 2001--the olden days! ~marisa

Originally posted on unmediated by del.icio.us/regine::regine