A History of Art and Technology in "Information Arts"

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Is it possibile to write a history of sorts on contemporary artists working with science and technology? Stephen Wilson, an academic, takes on the formidabile task in his massive new tome, Information Arts (MIT Press). Of course, some areas might seem lacking, such as Wilson's coverage of net art, but the author casts a wide net and makes a case for the importance of creative applications of math, physics, biology, and engineering. Most interesting is a playful quiz that Wilson presents, in which he asks the reader to guess what odd experiments are either art pieces or bizarre lab trials.

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Amerika in London

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The work of net artist and hypertext pioneer Mark Amerika was recently featured in his first European net art retrospective, HOW TO BE AN INTERNET ARTIST. This show and his new work of net art, FILMTEXT (commissioned by Playstation 2), will be presented in a second exhibition at the Institute for Contemporary Arts in London beginning this week (January 9 to be precise) through January 31. But you can get a sneak peak online now, if you'd like (hint: click on the link included here).

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Post-Holiday Sales...Even in Net Art "Shop"

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Michael Mandiberg Inc. rang in the new year with the completion of its yearlong identity marketplace, Shop Mandiberg -- which sells the belongings of digital artist Michael Mandiberg. A storewide 20% off sale propelled purchases, and Shop Mandiberg sold 101 items. Sadly, Shop Mandiberg is closing for business, but the site remains online as an archive.

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From the Military to the Masses

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Last year, 25 international media artists gathered together at Irbene, Latvia, at the site of an abandoned 32 meter dish antenna once used by the KGB to spy on satellite transmissions between Europe and North America. The artists explored creative interaction with a formerly military device and formulated a communications network. This week, the participating artists are unveiling projects inspired by their experiences in Latvia. Audio, video, web installations and images by Kim Cascone, Locomotive, Mukul, and others will be presented online.

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Readings by New Media Author

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How does a new media author present his work in the flesh? Find out this coming Saturday, at 4pm, when Brian Kim Stefans will read at Double Happiness at 173 Mott Street in Manhattan. Stefans' paper books include "Angry Penguins," "Gulf," and "Free Space Comix," but he is also a recognized digital artist and poet who has experimented with online narratives. (He'll be reading with Joan Retallack, author of the book "How to Do Things With Words.") Admission is $4.

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Democratic Net Art Awards

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Now's the time to vote for your favorite works of net art...because "net-art01," the fourth annual edition of England's open competition for net artists, has just been kicked off. If you're in Brixton, London, you can check out the nominated works, presented live. There, the entries will be projected onto various suitable surfaces at Bradys pub (at 20 Atlantic Road) from 4.30pm to 6.30pm every evening. Voting ends when the month of January is up, and the first-ever award ceremony is now being planned. Keep checking the "net-art01" site for updates.

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15 Years of New Media Art Coverage

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Although new media art as a genre hardly seems 15 years old, and the documentation of such art wouldn't seem to have a history that long, Fine Art Forum (fAf) has been online for a decade and a half. A website that chronicles new media art from around the globe, namely by artists in the Asia-Pacific region, fAf is celebrating its anniversary with a travelling showcase of works by emerging digital artists. The works premiered at the Multimedia Art Asia Pacific Festival (Brisbane) and Digital Media Festival (Manila) in October 2001; the program travels to various international venues before closing in Singapore in 2002.

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Time to Deal with...Time

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As this year morphs into the next one, many of us are asking ourselves if we are who were were a year ago...or have our experiences in 2001 changed us radically? Is it possible to measure these changes? Richard Rinehart's "Letters Through Time" invites visitors to write letters to themselves 20 years into the future or 20 years into the past to examine who we were and who we dream of being. Visitors attempt to answer the question of continuity by reading, comparing, and interpreting each other's letters. Be careful with what you disclose...and have fun browsing. You might learn a thing or two about *yourself*.

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