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Disembodied voices

By Rhizome

0triko.jpgExploded monologues is a rather fetching machine that you can strap on your shoulders to literally send your voice on one or more of the four different speakers, each of them located approximately one meter from your mouth. A control interface with four buttons enables you to select where the voice will be heard. An additional mask containing a microphone is worn to prevent the listener from hearing the performers voice directly.

Troika's device starts from a reflection on the dialogue through our new technologies of communication and the way they explode the boundaries of our bodies. 'Exploded monologue' is a performance tool that expands the possibilities of the narrative. The user is able to simulate different characters and play with the sonic space perceived by the listener.

Tomoaki Yanagisawa's Sonic Gun allows you to shoot sounds that you have previously recorded with the gun itself and send them to targets that play these sounds back. The targets can be placed anywhere -- on people, walls, or objects.

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In send mode, the gun simply sends a sound to a target, this mode could be used for leaving messages. In the play mode the target plays back sounds already placed in the target, for example listening to a message left in the target. In the send/play mode, the target plays back a recorded sound as soon as a person shoots it.

6tyuiop.jpgAnd a last one for the road: The Earworm Assault Devices, by Fur, enable you to distribute your own earworms, a piece of music (preferably irritating) that you hear and you can't forget anymore. Small pieces of sound or music can be recorded onto the devices and fired at single or multiple persons, spreading your message out into the world. They come in different shapes, sizes and modes of operation: caterpillar-driven tank, pistol, rifle or desert-dog (via Fur's blog, also on pixelsumo.)

Related: the midiGun, a music controlling weapon. Titled of the post inspired by this project.

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