A Large Scale Study of the Evolution of Web Pages

Posted by D. Jean Hester | Fri Aug 29th 2003 2:31 p.m.

<http://www.research.microsoft.com/aboutmsr/labs/siliconvalley/pubs/p97-fetterly/p97-fetterly.pdf>

"Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard researchers collaborated to write this paper
for the Twelfth International World Wide Web Conference in May 2003. The
paper looks at the Web as a dynamic entity, constantly changing, and
considers how this behavior affects its usability. In particular, search
engines are noted as being especially susceptible since they cannot possibly
have records of the most current version of every Web page. To measure the
rate and amount of change, the researchers "collected 151 million web pages
eleven times over, retaining salient information including a feature vector
of each page." Their results show which Web page parameters are strong
indicators of future change. "

-- D. Jean Hester
www.divestudio.org
Interviewer: "Must an artist be a programmer to make truly original online
art?"
John Simon: "Truly original? You Modernist! Whether you make art or not,
understanding programming is an amazing understanding."
from "Code as Creative Writing: An Interview with John Simon"

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  • Pall Thayer | Sat Aug 30th 2003 7:44 a.m.
    I just glanced briefly through this report. Was hoping to find something
    regarding the evolution of actual webcontent but that doesn't appear to be
    what this study was about. It looks like it was merely about updated
    content. However it would be more interesting to see a study about the
    evolution of actual content and even better to see whether the type of work
    that netartists do appears to have any impact on general website content or
    whether we're just following the trends set by corporate website content. In
    other words, whether we are mere 'Dedicated followers of fashion' or actual
    ground-breaking trend-setters. But then again, when has Microsoft ever shown
    an interest in anything 'new' or 'original'?

    Pall

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "D. Jean Hester" <jenajunk@hotmail.com>
    To: <list@rhizome.org>
    Sent: Friday, August 29, 2003 5:31 PM
    Subject: RHIZOME_RAW: A Large Scale Study of the Evolution of Web Pages

    >
    >
    >
    <http://www.research.microsoft.com/aboutmsr/labs/siliconvalley/pubs/p97-fett
    erly/p97-fetterly.pdf>
    >
    >
    > "Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard researchers collaborated to write this
    paper
    > for the Twelfth International World Wide Web Conference in May 2003. The
    > paper looks at the Web as a dynamic entity, constantly changing, and
    > considers how this behavior affects its usability. In particular, search
    > engines are noted as being especially susceptible since they cannot
    possibly
    > have records of the most current version of every Web page. To measure the
    > rate and amount of change, the researchers "collected 151 million web
    pages
    > eleven times over, retaining salient information including a feature
    vector
    > of each page." Their results show which Web page parameters are strong
    > indicators of future change. "
    >
    >
    >
    > -- D. Jean Hester
    > www.divestudio.org
    > Interviewer: "Must an artist be a programmer to make truly original online
    > art?"
    > John Simon: "Truly original? You Modernist! Whether you make art or not,
    > understanding programming is an amazing understanding."
    > from "Code as Creative Writing: An Interview with John Simon"
    >
    > _________________________________________________________________
    > Get MSN 8 and enjoy automatic e-mail virus protection.
    > http://join.msn.com/?pagethatures/virus
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