Whitney biennial accepting submissions

Posted by MTAA | Mon Jul 7th 2003 10:36 a.m.

it looks like the whitney biennial is accepting submissions this year.

this is unusual. it's my understanding that the whitney tracks you
down and hasn't accepted submissions in the past.

anyway, more info here:

http://www.whitney.org/exhibition/biennial.shtml

for those unfamiliar, it's only open to american artists.
--
<twhid>
http://www.mteww.com
</twhid>
  • Pall Thayer | Mon Jul 7th 2003 12:39 p.m.
    On Monday 07 July 2003 13:29, t.whid wrote:

    > http://www.whitney.org/exhibition/biennial.shtml
    >
    > for those unfamiliar, it's only open to american artists.

    That's so American of them.

    --
    Pall Thayer
    artist/teacher
    http://www.this.is/pallit
    http://www.this.is/isjs
    http://www.this.is/harmony
    http://130.208.220.190/panse
  • M. River | Mon Jul 7th 2003 2:28 p.m.
    > That's so American of them.
    >

    LOL, true. Although they do have an ever changeing idea of what "American" is. And that, I think, is positive in the end.
  • Liza Sabater | Mon Mar 8th 2004 8:40 p.m.
    Are Corey Archangel and Golan Levin the only software artists at the
    Biennial? How about net art? New media?
  • Patrick Simons | Tue Mar 9th 2004 7:19 a.m.
    Now now.......

    Perhaps it might be nice to have a "new american" category,
    you know.. Iraqi/ Guantanamo/Hiatian.

    We all want our cultural institutions to be in line with our cultural producers, don't we?

    M. River wrote:

    > > That's so American of them.
    > >
    >
    > LOL, true. Although they do have an ever changeing idea of what
    > "American" is. And that, I think, is positive in the end.
  • Dyske Suematsu | Tue Mar 9th 2004 12:14 p.m.
    It makes sense that the popularity of digital art is declining in the
    traditional art world, but it is not a bad thing. I think the traditional
    art world realizes the significance of digital art and the need to embrace
    it, but the physical structure and the power structure of their institutions
    are not conducive to digital art. What they are doing is equivalent to New
    York Times simply scanning their print edition and posting it on their
    website. The digital art world requires entirely different kinds of
    institutions.

    Since the nature of digital art structurally contradicts the traditional art
    world, it is unavoidable that the works they exhibit would suffer from it. A
    computer terminal without a chair in a museum where you can only use it for
    5 minutes because others are waiting behind you, is not a proper environment
    to experience digital art. And, in comparison to a large painting hung next
    to it at which you can stand and look as long as you like, a digital artwork
    looks like a mere toy. It is jarring to present a digital artwork in an
    environment that is designed to experience something physical. From this
    perspective, it makes sense that the popularity of digital art in the
    traditional art world would declined.

    Furthermore, the traditional art world has a long-established power
    structure built based on certain natures, limitations, and advantages of the
    physical world. When televisions were first introduced to the consumer
    market, the broadcasters struggled to come up with a structure that would
    make their business financially viable. Eventually the dust settled and the
    power structure emerged. A few key players secured a significant amount of
    power, and with it, they stabilized the whole industry. The same happened in
    the art world.

    The dust in the digital world is yet to settle. A definitive power structure
    is yet to emerge. Unlike the music industry where the paradigm shift is
    forcing the break-up of the established power structure, the digital art
    world is not a paradigm shift; it is a new, independent paradigm of art,
    which does not threaten the existing art world. It simply needs its own
    power structure that is based on its own natures, limitations, and
    advantages. It cannot rely on the structure of the traditional art world to
    deal with it. It needs its own way to sustain itself.

    -Dyske
  • Rachel Greene | Tue Mar 9th 2004 1:17 p.m.
    Miranda July and Harrell Fletcher''s website Learning to Love You More
    is in it, as is the online/game/action Velvet Strike (Brody Condon,
    Anne-Marie Schleiner, etc.). In terms of new media Tracy and Plastics,
    lots of sound art...

    On Mar 8, 2004, at 7:40 PM, liza sabater wrote:

    >
    > Are Corey Archangel and Golan Levin the only software artists at the
    > Biennial? How about net art? New media?
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