Mirapaul on Dietz Departure

Posted by Mark Tribe | Tue May 13th 2003 11:19 a.m.

From the New York Times, May 13, 2003:

"The Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, which has been a strong supporter of
Internet art, has dismissed the curator for its online art projects... the
center's director, Kathy Halbreich, said plans to build a digital-art
gallery would be deferred for at least five years... Under Mr. Dietz, who
joined the Walker in 1996, the center has vigorously supported the notion
of the Internet as a creative medium by commissioning a series of
online-only artworks and organizing several Web-based exhibitions... Ms.
Halbreich said she intended to keep the projects online but could not
commit to doing so until the cost was determined."

Full story at http://www.nytimes.com/2003/05/13/arts/13ARTS.html
  • MTAA | Tue May 13th 2003 11:30 a.m.
    >From the New York Times, May 13, 2003:
    >
    >"The Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, which has been a strong
    >supporter of Internet art, has dismissed the curator for its online
    >art projects... the center's director, Kathy Halbreich, said plans
    >to build a digital-art gallery would be deferred for at least five
    >years... Under Mr. Dietz, who joined the Walker in 1996, the center
    >has vigorously supported the notion of the Internet as a creative
    >medium by commissioning a series of online-only artworks and
    >organizing several Web-based exhibitions... Ms. Halbreich said she
    >intended to keep the projects online but could not commit to doing
    >so until the cost was determined."
    >
    >Full story at http://www.nytimes.com/2003/05/13/arts/13ARTS.html

    SAY WHAT!?

    "Ms. Halbreich said she intended to keep the projects online but
    could not commit to doing so until the cost was determined."

    Then they should transfer all the files to someone who will keep them
    online. THIS IS TOTALLY UNACCEPTABLE!
    --
    <twhid>
    http://www.mteww.com
    </twhid>
  • Are | Tue May 13th 2003 1:12 p.m.
    In a daring and innovative move, the Walker Art Center will now keep their online projects online, but only as thumbnail .gif screenshots of the actual projects. To keep costs down, each image will not be larger than 80x60 pixels and none will contain more than 16 colors, regardless of the original palette. All previously commissioned works will, however, be available in full at an onsite, intranet terminal, situated permanently in the Walker's gift shop. The local terminal will thus be accessible during normal opening hours, from 9am-5pm Monday through Thursday and until 8 pm on special-event Fridays. A nominal admission, or access fee, will be charged. The Walker director explains: 'This new move shows our outstanding commitment to new media, and it brings with it the added benefit of only exposing these masterpieces, all in the Walker collection, to a safe and secure computing environment free of malfunctions and technical mishaps.
  • marc garrett | Tue May 13th 2003 2:17 p.m.
    Now that is funny...

    marc

    > In a daring and innovative move, the Walker Art Center will now keep their
    online projects online, but only as thumbnail .gif screenshots of the actual
    projects. To keep costs down, each image will not be larger than 80x60
    pixels and none will contain more than 16 colors, regardless of the original
    palette. All previously commissioned works will, however, be available in
    full at an onsite, intranet terminal, situated permanently in the Walker's
    gift shop. The local terminal will thus be accessible during normal opening
    hours, from 9am-5pm Monday through Thursday and until 8 pm on special-event
    Fridays. A nominal admission, or access fee, will be charged. The Walker
    director explains: 'This new move shows our outstanding commitment to new
    media, and it brings with it the added benefit of only exposing these
    masterpieces, all in the Walker collection, to a safe and secure computing
    environment free of malfunctions and technical mishaps.
  • Harry Cummings | Tue May 13th 2003 2:20 p.m.
    > In a daring and innovative move, the Walker Art Center will now keep
    > their online projects online, but only as thumbnail .gif screenshots
    > of the actual projects. To keep costs down, each image will not be
    > larger than 80x60 pixels and none will contain more than 16 colors,
    > regardless of the original palette. All previously commissioned works
    > will, however, be available in full at an onsite, intranet terminal,
    > situated permanently in the Walker's gift shop. The local terminal
    > will thus be accessible during normal opening hours, from 9am-5pm
    > Monday through Thursday and until 8 pm on special-event Fridays. A
    > nominal admission, or access fee, will be charged. The Walker director
    > explains: ?This new move shows our outstanding commitment to new
    > media, and it brings with it the added benefit of only exposing these
    > masterpieces, all in the Walker collection, to a safe and secure
    > computing environment free of malfunctions and technical mishaps.?
    >
    > you for got to mention the five dollar a year subscriotion fee to artists to access their own work
  • Harry Cummings | Tue May 13th 2003 2:22 p.m.
    > In a daring and innovative move, the Walker Art Center will now keep
    > their online projects online, but only as thumbnail .gif screenshots
    > of the actual projects. To keep costs down, each image will not be
    > larger than 80x60 pixels and none will contain more than 16 colors,
    > regardless of the original palette. All previously commissioned works
    > will, however, be available in full at an onsite, intranet terminal,
    > situated permanently in the Walker's gift shop. The local terminal
    > will thus be accessible during normal opening hours, from 9am-5pm
    > Monday through Thursday and until 8 pm on special-event Fridays. A
    > nominal admission, or access fee, will be charged. The Walker director
    > explains: ?This new move shows our outstanding commitment to new
    > media, and it brings with it the added benefit of only exposing these
    > masterpieces, all in the Walker collection, to a safe and secure
    > computing environment free of malfunctions and technical mishaps.?
    >
    > you for got to mention the five dollar a year subscription fee to artists to access their own work
  • Christopher Fahey | Tue May 13th 2003 4:14 p.m.
    > All previously commissioned works will, however, be
    > available in full at an onsite, intranet terminal, situated
    > permanently in the Walker's gift shop. The local terminal
    > will thus be accessible during normal opening hours, from
    > 9am-5pm Monday through Thursday and until 8 pm on
    > special-event Fridays.

    I know you're joking, but it made me wonder how often internet artworks
    from the collections of such institutions are made available *at all* to
    people who visit in person their brick-and-mortar facilities. They are
    sometimes there for special events, or to mark the "opening" of the
    work, but really there is little technical reason why the entire
    permanent collection of the Walker's internet/digital artworks couldn't
    be featured at a dedicated console in the museum at all times.

    I'm not saying that the Walker *should* do this, or that the Whitney
    *should* install an Artport terminal in the giftshop. I think it's kinda
    cool that the new media divisions don't need to use even one square foot
    of valuable museum real estate to show their entire collection.

    -Cf

    [christopher eli fahey]
    art: http://www.graphpaper.com
    sci: http://www.askrom.com
    biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com
  • marc garrett | Tue May 13th 2003 4:57 p.m.
    Hi Mark,

    It seems, looking from over here in the UK that 'Net Art' in America is
    moving into the dark ages. A power hungry governmental administration that
    is gradually closing many portals/doors for creative net adventurers
    nationally and of course internationally. May be business indicatives (not
    necessarily corporate or Rockefeller based) and separate from funding
    demands can offer new answers...

    marc

    > To view this entire thread, click here:
    > http://rhizome.org/thread.rhiz?thread
  • Mark Tribe | Tue May 13th 2003 8:55 p.m.
    At 08:57 PM 5/13/2003 +0100, marc.garrett wrote:
    >Hi Mark,
    >
    >It seems, looking from over here in the UK that 'Net Art' in America is
    >moving into the dark ages.

    I wouldn't jump to that conclusion just yet. We are certainly witnessing a
    retrenchment in institutional support, but these things develop in cycles.
    I predict that in ten years time every major museum (and many of the
    not-so-major ones) will have a signficant commitment to new media art in
    some form. Meanwhile, the boundaries between new media art and other forms
    of art are getting blurrier--a welcome transition, in my opinion. The walls
    of the new media ghetto are crumbling. Bring 'em down!

    >A power hungry governmental administration that
    >is gradually closing many portals/doors for creative net adventurers
    >nationally and of course internationally.

    Yup. This is a bigger problem, and not just for artists.

    >May be business indicatives (not
    >necessarily corporate or Rockefeller based) and separate from funding
    >demands can offer new answers...

    Indicatives? Do you mean initiatives?

    > > To view this entire thread, click here:
    > > http://rhizome.org/thread.rhiz?thread
  • marc garrett | Wed May 14th 2003 8:48 a.m.
    Hi Mark,

    Do you mean initiatives? No, I mean esinitivat~yes initiatives...

    > I predict that in ten years time every major museum (and many of the
    > not-so-major ones) will have a signficant commitment to new media art in
    > some form. Meanwhile, the boundaries between new media art and other forms
    > of art are getting blurrier--a welcome transition, in my opinion. The
    walls
    > of the new media ghetto are crumbling. Bring 'em down!

    This will happen not just because of the institutions suddenly accepting net
    art and all its nuances, but because the many net groups/indivuduals out
    there are actively making real and solid connections with a social
    responsibility towards inclusivity, rather than centralized mind-sets
    behaviour patterns that isolate.

    marc

    > >Hi Mark,
    > >
    > >It seems, looking from over here in the UK that 'Net Art' in America is
    > >moving into the dark ages.
    >
    > I wouldn't jump to that conclusion just yet. We are certainly witnessing a
    > retrenchment in institutional support, but these things develop in cycles.

    I hope so, things are getting strange and it all feels a bit like a pretty
    >
    > >A power hungry governmental administration that
    > >is gradually closing many portals/doors for creative net adventurers
    > >nationally and of course internationally.
    >
    > Yup. This is a bigger problem, and not just for artists.
    >
    > >May be business indicatives (not
    > >necessarily corporate or Rockefeller based) and separate from funding
    > >demands can offer new answers...
    >
    > Indicatives? Do you mean initiatives?
    >
    > > > To view this entire thread, click here:
    > > > http://rhizome.org/thread.rhiz?thread
  • alexandra reill | Thu May 15th 2003 4:33 a.m.
    i am also wondering why the net art pieces should be installed in the gift
    shop ... strange idea

    cheers, sascha

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "marc.garrett" <marc.garrett@furtherfield.org>
    To: "Mark Tribe" <mt@rhizome.org>
    Cc: <list@rhizome.org>
    Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 9:57 PM
    Subject: RHIZOME_RAW: Re: RHIZOME_RARE: Mirapaul on Dietz Departure

    > Hi Mark,
    >
    > It seems, looking from over here in the UK that 'Net Art' in America is
    > moving into the dark ages. A power hungry governmental administration that
    > is gradually closing many portals/doors for creative net adventurers
    > nationally and of course internationally. May be business indicatives (not
    > necessarily corporate or Rockefeller based) and separate from funding
    > demands can offer new answers...
    >
    > marc
    >
    >
    >
    > > To view this entire thread, click here:
    > > http://rhizome.org/thread.rhiz?thread
  • alex galloway | Thu May 15th 2003 1:20 p.m.
    yeah, down at the World Financial Center Carnivore's installed in the
    food court. welcome to the unglamorous phase of net.art.

    which reminds me. calling all new yorkers--Matrix today, 3:15pm at
    Battery Park Stadium 16. then stick around the 'hood for my "exhibition
    tour" of the Digital Salon at 7pm sharp in the World Financial Center
    gallery (it's in the north end of the complex at 220 Vesey Street).

    http://www.sva.edu/salon/salon_10/event.php?event

    hey look, i'm "visionary"! ;-)

    On Thursday, May 15, 2003, at 03:30 AM, kanonmedia.com wrote:

    > i am also wondering why the net art pieces should be installed in the
    > gift
    > shop ... strange idea
    >
    > cheers, sascha
    >
    > ----- Original Message -----
    > From: "marc.garrett" <marc.garrett@furtherfield.org>
    > To: "Mark Tribe" <mt@rhizome.org>
    > Cc: <list@rhizome.org>
    > Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 9:57 PM
    > Subject: RHIZOME_RAW: Re: RHIZOME_RARE: Mirapaul on Dietz Departure
    >
    >
    >> Hi Mark,
    >>
    >> It seems, looking from over here in the UK that 'Net Art' in America
    >> is
    >> moving into the dark ages. A power hungry governmental administration
    >> that
    >> is gradually closing many portals/doors for creative net adventurers
    >> nationally and of course internationally. May be business indicatives
    >> (not
    >> necessarily corporate or Rockefeller based) and separate from funding
    >> demands can offer new answers...
    >>
    >> marc
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> To view this entire thread, click here:
    >>> http://rhizome.org/thread.rhiz?thread
  • Pall Thayer | Thu May 15th 2003 2:42 p.m.
    Maybe we should ask Kinko's to display netart on their computers when they're
    not in use. Netart: The Mcdonalds of the art world.

    When they finally finish developing that "digital paper" Xerox-parc has been
    working on, we can even have a netart take-out.

    "I'll have a Mark Napier with a side of Website unseen to go please..."

    Pall

    > yeah, down at the World Financial Center Carnivore's installed in the
    > food court. welcome to the unglamorous phase of net.art.
    >
    > which reminds me. calling all new yorkers--Matrix today, 3:15pm at
    > Battery Park Stadium 16. then stick around the 'hood for my "exhibition
    > tour" of the Digital Salon at 7pm sharp in the World Financial Center
    > gallery (it's in the north end of the complex at 220 Vesey Street).
    >
    > http://www.sva.edu/salon/salon_10/event.php?event
    >
    > hey look, i'm "visionary"! ;-)
    >
    >
    > On Thursday, May 15, 2003, at 03:30 AM, kanonmedia.com wrote:
    >
    > > i am also wondering why the net art pieces should be installed in the
    > > gift
    > > shop ... strange idea
    > >
    > > cheers, sascha
    > >
    > > ----- Original Message -----
    > > From: "marc.garrett" <marc.garrett@furtherfield.org>
    > > To: "Mark Tribe" <mt@rhizome.org>
    > > Cc: <list@rhizome.org>
    > > Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 9:57 PM
    > > Subject: RHIZOME_RAW: Re: RHIZOME_RARE: Mirapaul on Dietz
    Departure
    > >
    > >
    > >> Hi Mark,
    > >>
    > >> It seems, looking from over here in the UK that 'Net Art' in America
    > >> is
    > >> moving into the dark ages. A power hungry governmental administration
    > >> that
    > >> is gradually closing many portals/doors for creative net adventurers
    > >> nationally and of course internationally. May be business indicatives
    > >> (not
    > >> necessarily corporate or Rockefeller based) and separate from funding
    > >> demands can offer new answers...
    > >>
    > >> marc
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>> To view this entire thread, click here:
    > >>> http://rhizome.org/thread.rhiz?thread
  • Liza Sabater | Sun May 18th 2003 11:52 p.m.
    On Thursday, May 15, 2003, at 13:42 America/New_York, Pall Thayer wrote:
    > "I'll have a Mark Napier with a side of Website unseen to go please..."
    >

    I'll have a side of potatoland with that carnivore to go please.
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