Fw: RHIZOME DISCUSS: Re: Re: Fw: RHIZOME RAW: KOSOVO-DON'T WORRY...BE HAPPY

Posted by manik vauda marija manik nikola pilipovic | Fri Dec 28th 2007 6:25 a.m.

I'M VERY INTERESTED IN WHAT YOU SAY.I THINK YOU ARE RIGHT.
MANIK,2004/2007.

PS:Eric,read the date on Losebys mail!Date with him.
But subject of those discusion should be Kosovo and I'll answer you only =
if your mail have something about Kosovo.

----- Original Message -----=20
From: Eric Dymond=20
To: discuss@rhizome.org=20
Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2007 7:14 PM
Subject: RHIZOME_DISCUSS: Re: Re: Fw: RHIZOME RAW: KOSOVO-DON'T =
WORRY...BE HAPPY

Does this mean we're dating?
Reply via:http://rhizome.org/discuss/view/28115#addcommentanchor=20

Eric Dymond <dymond@idirect.ca>
Thursday, December 27, 2007 5:00 AM
discuss@rhizome.org <discuss@rhizome.org>
RHIZOME_DISCUSS: Re: Fw: RHIZOME RAW: KOSOVO-DON'T WORRY...BE HAPPY

Manik, you completely misread English. Everyone on the list is so =
forgiving of your use of the language but I'm not.Do you use Google or =
Babelfish to translate these posts?=20
Your response makes no sense to me given the broad brush that was used =
at the outset.=20
Please, find a good interpreter.=20
I never mentioned the US, and by the way.., ETC.
............................................................
www.seecult.org=20
Eric
Reply via:
http://rhizome.org/discuss/view/28106#addcommentanchor=20

----- Original Message -----=20
From: "Jess Loseby" <jess@rssgallery.com>
To: <list@rhizome.org>
Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2004 5:45 PM
Subject: Re: RHIZOME_RAW: ANY MORE IDIOT?

> does anyone else hear Peter Sellers voice (a bermb?) when reading=20
> MANIK emails? I think its because there is something very ordered=20
> about the arrangement of broken english. it does make the mails rather =

> entertaining instead of infuriating though if you read them this way.
>=20
> you can break up the monotony of a lot of tiresome emails this way. =
try=20
> James Mason for mark tribe or yoda for NAN
>=20
> just a thought.
>=20
> j.
> o
> /^\ rssgallery.com
> ][

  • Eric Dymond | Fri Dec 28th 2007 1:05 p.m.
    So..., we're not dating?!
    Kosovo, Kosovo, Kosovo, Kosovo..., that's all you want to talk about. What about me..., I have needs too! You're just so Eurocentric, it drives me mad.

  • BT Elder | Sat Dec 29th 2007 12:45 a.m.
    My name is BT Elder. I'm the director of Obscure Research Labs,
    and I'd like to take a couple of minutes of your time to explain just
    what it is we do here at the Labs and how grateful you should be for
    the services we provide.

    Doubtless, our name and organization is unknown to you. You're
    probably one of the people who benefits from our unceasing vigilance,
    but you'd never know it if we didn't tell you. Perhaps you've seen our
    anonymous white trucks cruising the streets of your town, or heard
    some of our public service messages on the static between your
    favorite radio stations. Probably not though; we keep a pretty low
    profile, and when I tell you what we do you'll understand why.

    As you're probably aware, our dear planet is in the grip of
    titanic, sizeless forces beyond most people's comprehension. Aliens,
    monsters and other non-human riffraff constantly subject ordinary
    citizens like yourself to the most horrible and unbelievable
    experiences. We're living in a kind of complex, secret
    interdimensional war zone; these things happen all the time, and on a
    global scale, but most people try to pretend they're not. This may be
    a wise course of action, if you think about it; I mean, after all,
    it's not like YOU'RE going to see one of these nameless shambling
    things, right? You have more important things to worry about-- your
    job, politics, sports, your family. We at Obscure Research Labs
    understand this reaction; we realize that while there's no hard
    evidence to support any of these alleged Damned Things, people keep
    seeing and interacting with 'em anyway. Which brings me to my first
    point: SOMEBODY has to mind the store, to keep watch on the border of
    the unknown, that others may sleep safely and comfortably. Obscure
    Research Labs is that borderwatch.

    Since 1962, we at Obscure Research Labs have been fighting for
    Earth's right to remain placid in the face of cosmic horror. Mind you,
    I don't mean that in a grandiose way. But just as not all brands of
    coffee taste the same, not all so-called "paranormal investigators"
    are the same, either. Some of them are only out to make a buck off of
    a fearful and gullible public. Many charge into a situation with some
    half-cocked notion of proper procedure, frightening the witnesses with
    vague talk of planetary confederations and missing time. We at Obscure
    Research Labs deplore this sort of thing, because when your back is to
    the weirdological wall you need a clear head and an open mind. The
    problem is, most investigators try to find some sort of "objective
    proof" for the things they're investigating. In our opinion, that's
    kind of a waste of time. Nothing against our well-intentioned
    colleagues, but in the first place, there is no such thing as
    "objective proof"; and in the second place, the last thing a witness
    needs after a brush with the slimy tentacles of the Unknown is
    somebody pawing all over their yard, taking soil and blood samples,
    hypnotizing them with little flashlights and putting them on talk
    shows. What they really need is a nice cup of tea and an assurance
    that they're not alone.

    Because, ultimately, what we are dealing with is not so much a
    thing as a belief in a thing, or several things. This is, at any rate,
    the best way to proceed. Let the aliens view us as lab animals, we
    certainly don't have to. Despite the success of such programs as
    Unsolved Mysteries and The X-Files, most people couldn't be bothered
    with a real alien abduction or Bigfoot sighting. They'd rather have
    the mystery, not the drudgery of finding the answer. Fortunately, we
    at Obscure Research Labs have found many procedural innovations that
    let us keep both. Some of these, like the mysterious Matrix, are
    detailed elsewhere in the program. We'll highlight others in future
    programs, unless, of course, the Men In Black get to us first. But
    I'll touch on just a few for right now, then I have to get back to the
    Staff Lounge for my noontime snack.

    The first is disinformation tracking. In order to detect the
    public's perceptual drift and anticipate areas of future concern, we
    need accurate, up-to-the-minute information on what everybody's
    thinking. To this end, we've developed a sort of meta-tap, that takes
    advantage of existing technology. As some of you may know, certain
    government agencies have placed monitors on the cable decoder boxes in
    everybody's home, turning the TV into a surveillance system that keeps
    an eye on potential troublemakers. But we at Obscure Research Labs
    have found a way to boost and convert the signal so it detects the
    emotional state of the TV audience and their reaction to whatever
    they're watching. It also jams the surveillance feed and improves your
    cable reception by 60%. If you're amazed at the picture quality of
    your cheap TV, chances are you're one of our target viewers.

    Another of our more visible projects is the old-fashioned
    human-in-the-street interview, directly asking people their opinions
    on a variety of seemingly inocuous subjects. This has the advantage of
    being a more ethically sound research method, and lets people know
    that Obscure Research Labs is "on their side". We'll see the results
    of some of these ineterviews later on in the program.

    Lastly, there's the "Three A.M. Watch." If you're still tuned in
    at this point, you probably know that 3 am is the statistically peak
    time for suicides, bad acid trips and UFO sightings. What you may not
    know, however, is that the three phenomena are related, but for
    reasons of planetary security we can't tell you why. What we can tell
    you is that the same technology we use for monitoring public
    perception has been put to the task of maintaining public health. If
    you have been sleeping unusually well, and dreaming pleasantly, for
    about the last, say, year or so, chances are you're in one of the
    Three AM Safe Areas.

    In closing, let me just say that we do what we do with you in
    mind. We keep a low profile, but that's because we have to in order
    that our work can go on unimpeded. So if you see an unmarkked white
    truck driving slowly about the streets of your town, or a hazmat team
    in tasteful pastels, or if you wake up in the middle of the night with
    a peculiar sensation that all's right with the world, just think a
    silent "thank you" to Obscure Research Labs. We'll know.

  • BT Elder | Sat Dec 29th 2007 2:57 a.m.
    My name is BT Elder. I'm the director of Obscure Research Labs,
    and I'd like to take a couple of minutes of your time to explain just
    what it is we do here at the Labs and how grateful you should be for
    the services we provide.

    Doubtless, our name and organization is unknown to you. You're
    probably one of the people who benefits from our unceasing vigilance,
    but you'd never know it if we didn't tell you. Perhaps you've seen our
    anonymous white trucks cruising the streets of your town, or heard
    some of our public service messages on the static between your
    favorite radio stations. Probably not though; we keep a pretty low
    profile, and when I tell you what we do you'll understand why.

    As you're probably aware, our dear planet is in the grip of
    titanic, sizeless forces beyond most people's comprehension. Aliens,
    monsters and other non-human riffraff constantly subject ordinary
    citizens like yourself to the most horrible and unbelievable
    experiences. We're living in a kind of complex, secret
    interdimensional war zone; these things happen all the time, and on a
    global scale, but most people try to pretend they're not. This may be
    a wise course of action, if you think about it; I mean, after all,
    it's not like YOU'RE going to see one of these nameless shambling
    things, right? You have more important things to worry about-- your
    job, politics, sports, your family. We at Obscure Research Labs
    understand this reaction; we realize that while there's no hard
    evidence to support any of these alleged Damned Things, people keep
    seeing and interacting with 'em anyway. Which brings me to my first
    point: SOMEBODY has to mind the store, to keep watch on the border of
    the unknown, that others may sleep safely and comfortably. Obscure
    Research Labs is that borderwatch.

    Since 1962, we at Obscure Research Labs have been fighting for
    Earth's right to remain placid in the face of cosmic horror. Mind you,
    I don't mean that in a grandiose way. But just as not all brands of
    coffee taste the same, not all so-called "paranormal investigators"
    are the same, either. Some of them are only out to make a buck off of
    a fearful and gullible public. Many charge into a situation with some
    half-cocked notion of proper procedure, frightening the witnesses with
    vague talk of planetary confederations and missing time. We at Obscure
    Research Labs deplore this sort of thing, because when your back is to
    the weirdological wall you need a clear head and an open mind. The
    problem is, most investigators try to find some sort of "objective
    proof" for the things they're investigating. In our opinion, that's
    kind of a waste of time. Nothing against our well-intentioned
    colleagues, but in the first place, there is no such thing as
    "objective proof"; and in the second place, the last thing a witness
    needs after a brush with the slimy tentacles of the Unknown is
    somebody pawing all over their yard, taking soil and blood samples,
    hypnotizing them with little flashlights and putting them on talk
    shows. What they really need is a nice cup of tea and an assurance
    that they're not alone.

    Because, ultimately, what we are dealing with is not so much a
    thing as a belief in a thing, or several things. This is, at any rate,
    the best way to proceed. Let the aliens view us as lab animals, we
    certainly don't have to. Despite the success of such programs as
    Unsolved Mysteries and The X-Files, most people couldn't be bothered
    with a real alien abduction or Bigfoot sighting. They'd rather have
    the mystery, not the drudgery of finding the answer. Fortunately, we
    at Obscure Research Labs have found many procedural innovations that
    let us keep both. Some of these, like the mysterious Matrix, are
    detailed elsewhere in the program. We'll highlight others in future
    programs, unless, of course, the Men In Black get to us first. But
    I'll touch on just a few for right now, then I have to get back to the
    Staff Lounge for my noontime snack.

    The first is disinformation tracking. In order to detect the
    public's perceptual drift and anticipate areas of future concern, we
    need accurate, up-to-the-minute information on what everybody's
    thinking. To this end, we've developed a sort of meta-tap, that takes
    advantage of existing technology. As some of you may know, certain
    government agencies have placed monitors on the cable decoder boxes in
    everybody's home, turning the TV into a surveillance system that keeps
    an eye on potential troublemakers. But we at Obscure Research Labs
    have found a way to boost and convert the signal so it detects the
    emotional state of the TV audience and their reaction to whatever
    they're watching. It also jams the surveillance feed and improves your
    cable reception by 60%. If you're amazed at the picture quality of
    your cheap TV, chances are you're one of our target viewers.

    Another of our more visible projects is the old-fashioned
    human-in-the-street interview, directly asking people their opinions
    on a variety of seemingly inocuous subjects. This has the advantage of
    being a more ethically sound research method, and lets people know
    that Obscure Research Labs is "on their side". We'll see the results
    of some of these ineterviews later on in the program.

    Lastly, there's the "Three A.M. Watch." If you're still tuned in
    at this point, you probably know that 3 am is the statistically peak
    time for suicides, bad acid trips and UFO sightings. What you may not
    know, however, is that the three phenomena are related, but for
    reasons of planetary security we can't tell you why. What we can tell
    you is that the same technology we use for monitoring public
    perception has been put to the task of maintaining public health. If
    you have been sleeping unusually well, and dreaming pleasantly, for
    about the last, say, year or so, chances are you're in one of the
    Three AM Safe Areas.

    In closing, let me just say that we do what we do with you in
    mind. We keep a low profile, but that's because we have to in order
    that our work can go on unimpeded. So if you see an unmarkked white
    truck driving slowly about the streets of your town, or a hazmat team
    in tasteful pastels, or if you wake up in the middle of the night with
    a peculiar sensation that all's right with the world, just think a
    silent "thank you" to Obscure Research Labs. We'll know.

  • Mark Andreesen | Sat Dec 29th 2007 3 a.m.
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