Mac Tech question

Posted by Lee Wells | Tue Jul 12th 2005 8:45 p.m.

Hi All:

So I just bought a new lacie harddrive and am getting ready to partition it.
Before I do so I was hoping to find out if I were to split it into 3
partitions, Would and of them be the faster partition.

Any help would be great.

Cheers,
Lee
--
Lee Wells
Brooklyn, NY 11222

http://www.leewells.org
917 723 2524
  • Plasma Studii | Wed Jul 13th 2005 6:28 a.m.
    >Hi All:
    >
    >So I just bought a new lacie harddrive and am getting ready to partition it.
    >Before I do so I was hoping to find out if I were to split it into 3
    >partitions, Would and of them be the faster partition.
    >
    >Any help would be great.
    >
    >Cheers,
    >Lee

    nope. works pretty much the same for all platforms. i suppose you
    could just periodically "defragment" one and not the others. or use
    a speed enhancing utility on just one. but not much reason to.

    your mac OS CD's come with a utility called "disk utility". it does
    "defragmenting" and repairs on any internal and external drives.
    keeps things running smooth. (it's been included since os 4, i
    think) you can use them or the lacie cds to partition, name,
    initialize drives.

    the only real benefit to partitioning on a mac though is that if one
    sector gets damaged, the damage only effects that part. using disk
    urtility, norton, or tech tool regularly makes that rare. on a pc, a
    partition lets you have multiple OS'es (not mac OS'es though), but
    generally on macs, there is software so you can run windows, linux,
    etc almost like programs and never re-boot. so there's little
    incentive to partition. but i may be wrong and somebody else might
    have a good use for it.

    guess you could format one (or more) for DOS, so you could use it
    cross platform.
  • RJDart | Thu Jul 14th 2005 8:41 p.m.
    On 13/07/2005, at 8:28 PM, judsoN wrote:

    >> Hi All:
    >>
    >> So I just bought a new lacie harddrive and am getting ready to
    >> partition it.
    >> Before I do so I was hoping to find out if I were to split it into 3
    >> partitions, Would and of them be the faster partition.
    >>
    >> Any help would be great.
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >> Lee
    >>
    >
    > nope. works pretty much the same for all platforms. i suppose you
    > could just periodically "defragment" one and not the others. or
    > use a speed enhancing utility on just one. but not much reason to.

    Exactly correct no difference between them, no advantage in de-
    fragmenting drives under OS X.
    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum%668

    >
    > your mac OS CD's come with a utility called "disk utility". it
    > does "defragmenting" and repairs on any internal and external
    > drives. keeps things running smooth. (it's been included since os
    > 4, i think) you can use them or the lacie cds to partition, name,
    > initialize drives.

    Disk utility does the job very well. http://www.thexlab.com/faqs/
    durepairfns.html

    Cocktail for daily Maintennance. http://www.macosxcocktail.com/

    http://www.thexlab.com a must visit site for all users of Mac.

    >
    > the only real benefit to partitioning on a mac though is that if
    > one sector gets damaged, the damage only effects that part. using
    > disk urtility, norton, or tech tool regularly makes that rare. on
    > a pc, a partition lets you have multiple OS'es (not mac OS'es
    > though), but generally on macs, there is software so you can run
    > windows, linux, etc almost like programs and never re-boot. so
    > there's little incentive to partition. but i may be wrong and
    > somebody else might have a good use for it.

    Do Not Use Norton products on a Mac. Diskwarrior for Drive problems -
    http://www.alsoft.com/DiskWarrior/ see X-Lab for other products.

    It makes sense to partition a huge drive into useable chunks as a
    precautionary measure as mentioned. But it does assist with caching
    of drive allowing it to operate more efficient also less wear on HD
    parts as it does not have to read whole drive every-time.

    If using for video editing partition as much space as possible for
    your capture drive then defrag this drive regularly.

    http://www.kenstone.net/fcp_homepage/basic_archiving_movie.html

    >
    > guess you could format one (or more) for DOS, so you could use it
    > cross platform.

    http://www.thexlab.com/faqs/sharefwdrive.html

    Cheers!
    `Rob
  • RJDart | Fri Jul 15th 2005 1:40 a.m.
    On 13/07/2005, at 8:28 PM, judsoN wrote:

    >> Hi All:
    >>
    >> So I just bought a new lacie harddrive and am getting ready to
    >> partition it.
    >> Before I do so I was hoping to find out if I were to split it into 3
    >> partitions, Would and of them be the faster partition.
    >>
    >> Any help would be great.
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >> Lee
    >>
    >>
    >
    > nope. works pretty much the same for all platforms. i suppose you
    > could just periodically "defragment" one and not the others. or
    > use a speed enhancing utility on just one. but not much reason to.
    >

    Exactly correct no difference between them, no advantage in de-
    fragmenting drives under OS X.
    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum%668

    >
    > your mac OS CD's come with a utility called "disk utility". it
    > does "defragmenting" and repairs on any internal and external
    > drives. keeps things running smooth. (it's been included since os
    > 4, i think) you can use them or the lacie cds to partition, name,
    > initialize drives.
    >

    Disk utility does the job very well. http://www.thexlab.com/faqs/
    durepairfns.html

    Cocktail for daily Maintennance. http://www.macosxcocktail.com/

    http://www.thexlab.com a must visit site for all users of Mac.

    >
    > the only real benefit to partitioning on a mac though is that if
    > one sector gets damaged, the damage only effects that part. using
    > disk urtility, norton, or tech tool regularly makes that rare. on
    > a pc, a partition lets you have multiple OS'es (not mac OS'es
    > though), but generally on macs, there is software so you can run
    > windows, linux, etc almost like programs and never re-boot. so
    > there's little incentive to partition. but i may be wrong and
    > somebody else might have a good use for it.
    >

    Do Not Use Norton products on a Mac. Diskwarrior for Drive problems -
    http://www.alsoft.com/DiskWarrior/ see X-Lab for other products.

    It makes sense to partition a huge drive into useable chunks as a
    precautionary measure as mentioned. But it does assist with caching
    of drive allowing it to operate more efficient also less wear on HD
    parts as it does not have to read whole drive every-time.

    If using for video editing partition as much space as possible for
    your capture drive then defrag this drive regularly.

    http://www.kenstone.net/fcp_homepage/basic_archiving_movie.html

    >
    > guess you could format one (or more) for DOS, so you could use it
    > cross platform.
    >

    http://www.thexlab.com/faqs/sharefwdrive.html

    Cheers!
    `Rob
  • RJDart | Sun Jul 17th 2005 6:10 p.m.
    On 13/07/2005, at 8:28 PM, judsoN wrote:

    >> Hi All:
    >>
    >> So I just bought a new lacie harddrive and am getting ready to
    >> partition it.
    >> Before I do so I was hoping to find out if I were to split it into 3
    >> partitions, Would and of them be the faster partition.
    >>
    >> Any help would be great.
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >> Lee
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    > nope. works pretty much the same for all platforms. i suppose you
    > could just periodically "defragment" one and not the others. or
    > use a speed enhancing utility on just one. but not much reason to.
    >
    >
    >

    Exactly correct no difference between them, no advantage in de-
    fragmenting drives under OS X.
    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum%668

    >
    > your mac OS CD's come with a utility called "disk utility". it
    > does "defragmenting" and repairs on any internal and external
    > drives. keeps things running smooth. (it's been included since os
    > 4, i think) you can use them or the lacie cds to partition, name,
    > initialize drives.
    >
    >
    >

    Disk utility does the job very well. http://www.thexlab.com/faqs/
    durepairfns.html

    Cocktail for daily Maintennance. http://www.macosxcocktail.com/

    http://www.thexlab.com a must visit site for all users of Mac.

    >
    > the only real benefit to partitioning on a mac though is that if
    > one sector gets damaged, the damage only effects that part. using
    > disk urtility, norton, or tech tool regularly makes that rare. on
    > a pc, a partition lets you have multiple OS'es (not mac OS'es
    > though), but generally on macs, there is software so you can run
    > windows, linux, etc almost like programs and never re-boot. so
    > there's little incentive to partition. but i may be wrong and
    > somebody else might have a good use for it.
    >
    >
    >

    Do Not Use Norton products on a Mac. Diskwarrior for Drive problems -
    http://www.alsoft.com/DiskWarrior/ see X-Lab for other products.

    It makes sense to partition a huge drive into useable chunks as a
    precautionary measure as mentioned. But it does assist with caching
    of drive allowing it to operate more efficient also less wear on HD
    parts as it does not have to read whole drive every-time.

    If using for video editing partition as much space as possible for
    your capture drive then defrag this drive regularly.

    http://www.kenstone.net/fcp_homepage/basic_archiving_movie.html

    >
    > guess you could format one (or more) for DOS, so you could use it
    > cross platform.
    >
    >
    >

    http://www.thexlab.com/faqs/sharefwdrive.html

    Cheers!
    `Rob
  • TJ ODonnell | Mon Jul 18th 2005 5:57 a.m.
    actually- there is a performance hit if you do not de-fragment your drive under system X-- IF you are using the drive for video. I have to defrag my drive once a month (I do loads of vid each day).

    I HIGHLY recommend you use Tech tool-- it has saved my life twice this year-- and is excellent in finding and repairing hidden defaults in drives over 500gig.

    Well worth the investment.
  • Robert Spahr | Mon Jul 18th 2005 7:45 a.m.
    Apple states anyone using OS X 10.2 or above would not need to optimize a
    disk.

    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum%668

    Here is an interesting bit of text from this page:

    "For these reasons, there is little benefit to defragmenting.
    Note:Mac OS X systems use hundreds of thousands of small files, many of which
    are rarely accessed. Optimizing them can be a major effort for very little
    practical gain. There is also a chance that one of the files placed in the
    "hot band" for rapid reads during system startup might be moved during
    defragmentation, which would decrease performance."

    -- Rob

    On Mon July 18 2005 11:57 am, TJ ODonnell wrote:
    > actually- there is a performance hit if you do not de-fragment your drive
    > under system X-- IF you are using the drive for video. I have to defrag my
    > drive once a month (I do loads of vid each day).
    >
    > I HIGHLY recommend you use Tech tool-- it has saved my life twice this
    > year-- and is excellent in finding and repairing hidden defaults in drives
    > over 500gig.
    >
    > Well worth the investment.
    > +
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    --
    --

    Robert Spahr
    http://www.robertspahr.com

    "As nightfall does not come all at once, neither does oppression.
    In both instances, there is a twilight when everything remains
    seemingly unchanged. And it is in such twilight that we all must
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    -- Justice William O. Douglas
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