Re: Re: Arts Intolerance: Emily Jacir/Ulrich MuseumWichita

Posted by Cinque Hicks | Wed Dec 15th 2004 10:49 p.m.

> But the current situation is that the people who commissioned the work
> in the first place have invited the prostesters into the lobby to keep
> warm, in other words they have sprung an ambush on the artist without so
> much as a by your leave. In doing so, they have validated the protest
> (which is of course a political protest, not an art protest). And god
> knows where that leads us, as others have pointed out.

Here's where that leads us: we who make things will have to acknowledge
the extent to which we exist on a continuum of ideas and activities with
all those slogs who work at the mini-mart and those motherfuckers who
bought their kids robotic babies for Christmas.

I for one welcome a reinvention of art as it was practiced before those
bigoted modernists got their hands on it. Before there was some
presumption that art deserved to be situated apart, away and free from
harassment. Remember artists used to be thought of in the same category as
carpenters and locksmiths. We were all just people who made shit.

I have so much faith in art. I have so much faith in creation. I know that
it flourishes even in the most repressive political regimes (to wit,
Zimbabwe, Eastern Europe...think of the art Cuba has produced). I have so
much faith in art, and so much faith in the talent of Miss Jacir that I
believe her work can survive--can thrive even--in a riotous, noisy,
unpolished marketplace of ideas. And if it doesn't, well then so be it.
History has a way of disposing of that which is useless to it.

Cinque Hicks, aka MAZE the Low Res
http://www.influxhouse.com
==================================
Electric Skin: Black Art and Techno-Culture News from the Front Lines
http://www.electricskin.com
  • ryan griffis | Thu Dec 16th 2004 12:38 p.m.
    >
    > I have so much faith in art. I have so much faith in creation. I know
    > that
    > it flourishes even in the most repressive political regimes (to wit,
    > Zimbabwe, Eastern Europe...think of the art Cuba has produced). I have
    > so
    > much faith in art, and so much faith in the talent of Miss Jacir that I
    > believe her work can survive--can thrive even--in a riotous, noisy,
    > unpolished marketplace of ideas. And if it doesn't, well then so be it.
    > History has a way of disposing of that which is useless to it

    Good points Cinque. and i tend to agree with your acceptance of
    political confrontation in the "cultural" sphere. But the problem here
    is not that the University is attempting to elevate dialogue, it's that
    it is attempting to frame the voice of the artist. it could just as
    easily be the voice of a teacher, administrator, whatever. and is more
    in line with the campaign to frame biological evolutionary theory as a
    scientifically contentious thing. Sure, it may be contentious - it is a
    THEORY - but to situate the issue as polar between creationism and
    evolution is entirely, deliberately misleading. It's not whether
    Jacir's work survives as Art. i mean, what's really at stake in that.
    it's more that her voice be allowed to enter into a debate on its own
    terms, not at the mercy of an opposed ideology. The analogy of the
    "free market" is scary, frankly. As is your use of "History." History,
    after all is the story of the powerful. And who's the powerful in the
    US at the moment?
    ryan
  • joseph mcelroy | Thu Dec 16th 2004 2:51 p.m.
    Cinque wrote:

    >>
    >> I have so much faith in art. I have so much faith in creation. I know
    >> that
    >> it flourishes even in the most repressive political regimes (to wit,
    >> Zimbabwe, Eastern Europe...think of the art Cuba has produced). I
    >> have so
    >> much faith in art, and so much faith in the talent of Miss Jacir that I
    >> believe her work can survive--can thrive even--in a riotous, noisy,
    >> unpolished marketplace of ideas. And if it doesn't, well then so be it.
    >> History has a way of disposing of that which is useless to it
    >
    Rationalism defending cowardness ... would you make the same defense
    for someone bigger than you kicking the shit out of you so that you
    passed out and could not recite some poetry? Of course, rational
    debate is not the point - you have "faith"

    sheesh...an art fundamentalist... a wolf in black sheep clothing.

    The reason art survives in repressive political regimes is because
    people FIGHT to have it survive.

    joseph mcelroy
  • Ivan Pope | Thu Dec 16th 2004 5:52 p.m.
    > Cinque wrote:
    >
    >>>
    >>> I have so much faith in art. I have so much faith in creation. I
    >>> know that
    >>> it flourishes even in the most repressive political regimes (to wit,
    >>> Zimbabwe, Eastern Europe...think of the art Cuba has produced). I
    >>> have so
    >>> much faith in art, and so much faith in the talent of Miss Jacir that I
    >>> believe her work can survive--can thrive even--in a riotous, noisy,
    >>> unpolished marketplace of ideas. And if it doesn't, well then so be it.
    >>> History has a way of disposing of that which is useless to it
    >>
    >>
    >
    > sheesh...an art fundamentalist... a wolf in black sheep clothing.
    >

    Quite. History has nothing to do with it. People/regimes/cultures have a
    way of disposing of that which _seems_ useless to it. It is our job to
    resist assimilation.
    Even in the boondocks. Even in places where we can't quite see what the
    point of resisting is. If we don't resist, then there will be no art
    that does more than please the eye. I liked the guy who said 'please
    keep bringing art, art changed me'.
    Ivan
Your Reply