Net Art documentation

Posted by Daniel Pearce | Thu Jul 15th 2004 2:51 a.m.

Hia,

I am currently in the process of finishing my masters, and one of the issues I want to explore are the boundaries (or no :) between net art and the documentation of net art. The main area of the work I am currently researching, is in regard to textual narratives in online communities, but I don’t really want to produce a static text documenting my research. Given the area of my research I thought it would be more rewarding to produce an artwork that explored the intertextual boundaries between net art and documentation.

I’d be really grateful if anyone could point me in the direction of artworks/practitioners/critical writings that explore this theme?

Many thanks

Daniel
  • Jason Van Anden | Thu Jul 15th 2004 5:58 a.m.
    It sounds like something I would like to see when it is done.

    At the risk of stating the obvious, the first place I would start is with Rachel Greene's recent book: "Internet Art". It's the first of it's kind, and super thorough.

    I have some other thoughts, but I am not clear about what you mean by "the boundaries (or no :) between net art and the documentation of net art". Specifically, what do you mean by boundaries?

    Jason Van Anden
    www.smileproject.com
  • Daniel Pearce | Thu Jul 15th 2004 7:37 a.m.
    Hi Jason,
    I appreciate the term’s abrupt, perhaps even contradictory. I have used it here to describe the area where the issues of a how a text is read, would be important for its (mis)understanding by a reader.

    Thanks

    Daniel

    Jason Van Anden wrote:

    > It sounds like something I would like to see when it is done.
    >
    > At the risk of stating the obvious, the first place I would start is
    > with Rachel Greene's recent book: "Internet Art". It's the first of
    > it's kind, and super thorough.
    >
    > I have some other thoughts, but I am not clear about what you mean by
    > "the boundaries (or no :) between net art and the documentation of net
    > art". Specifically, what do you mean by boundaries?
    >
    > Jason Van Anden
    > www.smileproject.com
  • Jason Van Anden | Thu Jul 15th 2004 8:30 a.m.
    I am still confused. Are you planning to make visual art that explores these boundaries, or write a paper that presents the state of net art documentation?

    The former puts you in good company (check out the Artbase) - the latter sounds like an interesting read.

    Jason Van Anden
    www.smileproject.com
  • Liza Sabater | Fri Jul 16th 2004 12:05 p.m.
    On Thursday, Jul 15, 2004, at 04:50 America/New_York, Daniel Pearce
    wrote:
    > but I don’t really want to produce a static text documenting my
    > research.

    If you are documenting net art, have you considered something a la
    www.wikipedia.org ?

    / l i z a
  • // jonCates | Fri Jul 16th 2004 5:12 p.m.
    Daniel wrote:
    >I‚Aod be really grateful if anyone could point me in the direction of
    >artworks/practitioners/critical writings that explore this theme?

    criticalartware is perhaps not so much capital N net capital A art oriented but moore about lowercase a artware (which of course crosses paths w/the category of Net Art) ++ capital V video captial A art. criticalartware positions [software-as-art/art-as-software] + comments on the early moments of Video Art + artware. goto:

    http://www.criticalartware.net

    + create a [new person node/login] for yourself.

    the criticalartware [application/platform] is free (as in no fees) + open (as in encourages collaborative participation).

    > Given the area of my research I thought it would be more rewarding to
    >produce an artwork that explored the intertextual boundaries between
    >net art and documentation.

    criticalartware is deeply invested in + engaged by this approach + have foregrounded this concern in our activities. criticalartware's shared resources are deeply interconnected + intertextual. liken, the [code structure/responsive system] that underlies criticalartware, functions as an artware + substructure, growing based on open participation by anyone who contributes to criticalartware. liken's [form/structure/body] is [a/an] [product/agent] of criticalartware's resources growing symbiotically with collaborative texts (likis), comments + the posting of nodes. in a recent discussion on the empyre listserv where we (criticalartware) were the guests for the month of May bensyverson (a coreDeveloper of criticalartware, the creator of liken + the author of the liki system) wrote:

    "one unique aspect of liken is that anything posted is autolinked, both retroactively and forevermore. So when we post a historical document, it is not merely [archived/preserved/linked-to]; it becomes a dynamic portal, an ever-changing linguistic map."

    data.src:
    Subject: Re: [-empyre-] archiving + preservation
    To: soft_skinned_space <empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au>
    From: ben syverson <ben@bensyverson.com>
    Date: Tue, 4 May 2004 17:09:20 -0500

    the empyre conversation for the month of May can be accessed [in/on] liken @ savegame 648:

    http://www.criticalartware.net

    [+/or] the empyre archive:

    http://lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au/pipermail/empyre/2004-May/date.html

    / l i z a wrote:
    >If you are documenting net art, have you considered something a la
    >www.wikipedia.org ?

    i have posted sum of these bits here + elseware but they apply here again...

    //begin re-(x)-post bits

    when we developed liken, the new substructure of criticalartware, bensyverson took the Wiki concept + built a different approach called Likis. ben improved upon the Wiki concept w/Likis by creating a more automagical system for authoring [links/paths] through the growing network of shared resources that are available [in/on] criticalartware.

    "So what is a Liki? Likis are kind of like wikis; anyone can edit them, and they are highly interlinked with each other. Likis are different than Wiki s in that you don't have to use BumpyCaps to make a link -- if you write 'cybernetics is k-rad' in a Liki , it will automagically link to the cybernetics liki. Why is that important? Because it means you don't have to consciously make links! You can just write, and the links will appear. " ... "Furthermore, although only an editable document in Liken is called a Liki, any normal non-editable comment that you make on a node will be 'likified;' its text will automatically link up to likis."

    - bensyverson (coreDeveloper of criticalartware, creator of liken + author of likis)
    from: savegame 148

    <---! CUT-N-PASTE !--->

    "liken stores criticalartware's growing database of information, resources + discourse as a collection of self-connecting nodes that anyone can add to [+/or] comment on. the pathways connecting these nodes slowly change based on use; more popular paths grow stronger, while weaker paths fade away. these relationships are also described in a public XML file, making it possible for anyone to develop alternate [interfaces/interpretations] of liken's unique + ever-changing content + structure. the paths that liken users follow can be [stored/reviewed/discussed], + affect the structure of the [application/platform] itself, creating a [literal/cybernetic] feedback loop in which less-used paths wither away, well-used paths are strengthened, + entirely new paths grow + crisscross recursively in response to discussion + new resources."

    -coreDevelopers of criticalartware
    from: Subject: criticalartware_Version.3.1415926535

    <---! CUT-N-PASTE !--->

    the best way to understand criticalartware as an [artware/application/platform] is by becoming involved. create a login + begin [contributing to/shaping] the shared resources of:

    http://www.criticalartware.net

    //end re-(x)-post bits

    data.src:

    //jonCates
    -> criticalartware -> core.dvr
    http://www.criticalartware.net

    <--! NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION EXCEPT ON RHIZOME.ORG WEBSITE AND EMAIL LISTS. !--->
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