Question?

Posted by marc garrett | Thu Feb 5th 2004 4:52 p.m.

Question?

So as the mapping of Internet creativity continues are the more independent
groups going to be ignored due to nationalist preferences and institutional
gate-keeping?

If this is the case how do we change this?

marc
  • Liza Sabater | Thu Feb 5th 2004 9:12 p.m.
    On Thursday, February 5, 2004, at 03:52 PM, marc garrett wrote:

    > Question?
    >
    > So as the mapping of Internet creativity continues are the more
    > independent
    > groups going to be ignored due to nationalist preferences and
    > institutional
    > gate-keeping?
    >
    > If this is the case how do we change this?
    >
    > marc
    >

    Hi Marc,

    I say, make your organization less browser dependent and, in that same
    vein, more interactive outside of the browser. Meaning, WAP, RSS, PDA
    friendly. Make it easy for people to trackback, ping, linkback (or
    whatever it is you want to call it) your content. Make it easy for
    others to create a web of context around your site. Will it create more
    hassles like comment-spam? Absolutely, that may well be the case. But
    the internet is not just about content, it's about people and the only
    way you're going to get people to commit to your message is by engaging
    them in a dialogue. And just getting them into your site is not enough.

    The web browser does not scale. With an aggregator, I can scan more
    than 300 sites on a daily basis. Back in the old days, I could view
    most of the web on a week (1995). You've just gotta make it easier for
    people to get to furtherfield. I mean, I rarely go to Rhizome's front
    door --because I have no incentive to do so. On the other hand, with
    Rhizome Raw, even if it does not have the activity of its hey-day it is
    still the most interesting thing Rhizome has to offer because it is
    Rhizome's social space. If I could have it on my aggregator, it would
    make me even happier.

    Furtherfield is a fabulous site with a lot of interesting stuff to look
    at --but I have to go to your front door to know what's new. I'm sorry
    but the ease of looking at more than 300 sites in under an hour will
    kick out any non-syndicated sites from my "Must See" list. And, no, RSS
    is not just a geek thing. MyYahoo! just introduced an RSS module to
    their services. They made email ubiquitous, I am sure that they'll do
    the same with RSS.

    So the moral of the story is: Make it easy for your potential audience
    to get to your content in as many ways as possible. I mean, your site
    is supported by the BBC. Make sure you check their web-dev process. I
    read their specs were floating somewhere on Kazaa.

    Best,

    l i z a
    =========================
    www.culturekitchen.com
  • marc garrett | Thu Feb 5th 2004 9:21 p.m.
    Hi LIza,

    You did not answer the question its self but you certainly opened it up to
    excellent other ideas - with a genuine response which has triggered off some
    fresh cranium shifts, answering many other issues that we are in the motions
    of trying to sort out - which is pretty cool...

    How much do you charge for such a quality consultation?

    You've cheered me up Liza, an excellent email, much thanx :-)

    marc

    >
    > Hi Marc,
    >
    > I say, make your organization less browser dependent and, in that same
    > vein, more interactive outside of the browser. Meaning, WAP, RSS, PDA
    > friendly. Make it easy for people to trackback, ping, linkback (or
    > whatever it is you want to call it) your content. Make it easy for
    > others to create a web of context around your site. Will it create more
    > hassles like comment-spam? Absolutely, that may well be the case. But
    > the internet is not just about content, it's about people and the only
    > way you're going to get people to commit to your message is by engaging
    > them in a dialogue. And just getting them into your site is not enough.
    >
    > The web browser does not scale. With an aggregator, I can scan more
    > than 300 sites on a daily basis. Back in the old days, I could view
    > most of the web on a week (1995). You've just gotta make it easier for
    > people to get to furtherfield. I mean, I rarely go to Rhizome's front
    > door --because I have no incentive to do so. On the other hand, with
    > Rhizome Raw, even if it does not have the activity of its hey-day it is
    > still the most interesting thing Rhizome has to offer because it is
    > Rhizome's social space. If I could have it on my aggregator, it would
    > make me even happier.
    >
    > Furtherfield is a fabulous site with a lot of interesting stuff to look
    > at --but I have to go to your front door to know what's new. I'm sorry
    > but the ease of looking at more than 300 sites in under an hour will
    > kick out any non-syndicated sites from my "Must See" list. And, no, RSS
    > is not just a geek thing. MyYahoo! just introduced an RSS module to
    > their services. They made email ubiquitous, I am sure that they'll do
    > the same with RSS.
    >
    > So the moral of the story is: Make it easy for your potential audience
    > to get to your content in as many ways as possible. I mean, your site
    > is supported by the BBC. Make sure you check their web-dev process. I
    > read their specs were floating somewhere on Kazaa.
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > l i z a
    > =========================
    > www.culturekitchen.com
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  • Lee Wells | Fri Feb 6th 2004 12:12 a.m.
    Hi Liza,

    I must agree with Marc.
    I think that was one of the most concise and important things stated here in
    quite a while.

    Kudos

    Cheers,
    Lee

    on 2/5/04 20:20, marc garrett at marc.garrett@furtherfield.org wrote:

    > Hi LIza,
    >
    > You did not answer the question its self but you certainly opened it up to
    > excellent other ideas - with a genuine response which has triggered off some
    > fresh cranium shifts, answering many other issues that we are in the motions
    > of trying to sort out - which is pretty cool...
    >
    > How much do you charge for such a quality consultation?
    >
    > You've cheered me up Liza, an excellent email, much thanx :-)
    >
    > marc
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>
    >> Hi Marc,
    >>
    >> I say, make your organization less browser dependent and, in that same
    >> vein, more interactive outside of the browser. Meaning, WAP, RSS, PDA
    >> friendly. Make it easy for people to trackback, ping, linkback (or
    >> whatever it is you want to call it) your content. Make it easy for
    >> others to create a web of context around your site. Will it create more
    >> hassles like comment-spam? Absolutely, that may well be the case. But
    >> the internet is not just about content, it's about people and the only
    >> way you're going to get people to commit to your message is by engaging
    >> them in a dialogue. And just getting them into your site is not enough.
    >>
    >> The web browser does not scale. With an aggregator, I can scan more
    >> than 300 sites on a daily basis. Back in the old days, I could view
    >> most of the web on a week (1995). You've just gotta make it easier for
    >> people to get to furtherfield. I mean, I rarely go to Rhizome's front
    >> door --because I have no incentive to do so. On the other hand, with
    >> Rhizome Raw, even if it does not have the activity of its hey-day it is
    >> still the most interesting thing Rhizome has to offer because it is
    >> Rhizome's social space. If I could have it on my aggregator, it would
    >> make me even happier.
    >>
    >> Furtherfield is a fabulous site with a lot of interesting stuff to look
    >> at --but I have to go to your front door to know what's new. I'm sorry
    >> but the ease of looking at more than 300 sites in under an hour will
    >> kick out any non-syndicated sites from my "Must See" list. And, no, RSS
    >> is not just a geek thing. MyYahoo! just introduced an RSS module to
    >> their services. They made email ubiquitous, I am sure that they'll do
    >> the same with RSS.
    >>
    >> So the moral of the story is: Make it easy for your potential audience
    >> to get to your content in as many ways as possible. I mean, your site
    >> is supported by the BBC. Make sure you check their web-dev process. I
    >> read their specs were floating somewhere on Kazaa.
    >>
    >> Best,
    >>
    >> l i z a
    >> =========================
    >> www.culturekitchen.com
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    > +
    > -> post: list@rhizome.org
    > -> questions: info@rhizome.org
    > -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
    > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
    > -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
    > +
    > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
    > Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
    >
  • Matthew Mascotte | Fri Feb 6th 2004 9:57 a.m.
    Liza-

    No doubt, that is the most articulate and savvy
    networking strategy i've seen in a long while...

    respects,

    Matthew

    On Thursday, February 05, 2004, at 05:12PM, liza sabater <liza@culturekitchen.com> wrote:

    >On Thursday, February 5, 2004, at 03:52 PM, marc garrett wrote:
    >
    >> Question?
    >>
    >> So as the mapping of Internet creativity continues are the more
    >> independent
    >> groups going to be ignored due to nationalist preferences and
    >> institutional
    >> gate-keeping?
    >>
    >> If this is the case how do we change this?
    >>
    >> marc
    >>
    >
    >Hi Marc,
    >
    >I say, make your organization less browser dependent and, in that same
    >vein, more interactive outside of the browser. Meaning, WAP, RSS, PDA
    >friendly. Make it easy for people to trackback, ping, linkback (or
    >whatever it is you want to call it) your content. Make it easy for
    >others to create a web of context around your site. Will it create more
    >hassles like comment-spam? Absolutely, that may well be the case. But
    >the internet is not just about content, it's about people and the only
    >way you're going to get people to commit to your message is by engaging
    >them in a dialogue. And just getting them into your site is not enough.
    >
    >The web browser does not scale. With an aggregator, I can scan more
    >than 300 sites on a daily basis. Back in the old days, I could view
    >most of the web on a week (1995). You've just gotta make it easier for
    >people to get to furtherfield. I mean, I rarely go to Rhizome's front
    >door --because I have no incentive to do so. On the other hand, with
    >Rhizome Raw, even if it does not have the activity of its hey-day it is
    >still the most interesting thing Rhizome has to offer because it is
    >Rhizome's social space. If I could have it on my aggregator, it would
    >make me even happier.
    >
    >Furtherfield is a fabulous site with a lot of interesting stuff to look
    >at --but I have to go to your front door to know what's new. I'm sorry
    >but the ease of looking at more than 300 sites in under an hour will
    >kick out any non-syndicated sites from my "Must See" list. And, no, RSS
    >is not just a geek thing. MyYahoo! just introduced an RSS module to
    >their services. They made email ubiquitous, I am sure that they'll do
    >the same with RSS.
    >
    >So the moral of the story is: Make it easy for your potential audience
    >to get to your content in as many ways as possible. I mean, your site
    >is supported by the BBC. Make sure you check their web-dev process. I
    >read their specs were floating somewhere on Kazaa.
    >
    >Best,
    >
    >l i z a
    >=========================
    >www.culturekitchen.com
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  • Rachel Greene | Fri Feb 6th 2004 3:22 p.m.
    I also wouldn't characterize those who aren't interested in
    participating as being subject to nationalist preferences or
    gate-keeping. Seems a cynical evaluation of a group of (chiefly) highly
    intelligent, net-savvy, international, free-thinking people, and it's
    not exactly an inviting or inclusive mode of address towards your
    potential peers. -- Rachel

    On Feb 6, 2004, at 8:57 AM, Matthew Mascotte wrote:

    >
    > Liza-
    >
    > No doubt, that is the most articulate and savvy
    > networking strategy i've seen in a long while...
    >
    >
    > respects,
    >
    > Matthew
    >
    > On Thursday, February 05, 2004, at 05:12PM, liza sabater
    > <liza@culturekitchen.com> wrote:
    >
    >> On Thursday, February 5, 2004, at 03:52 PM, marc garrett wrote:
    >>
    >>> Question?
    >>>
    >>> So as the mapping of Internet creativity continues are the more
    >>> independent
    >>> groups going to be ignored due to nationalist preferences and
    >>> institutional
    >>> gate-keeping?
    >>>
    >>> If this is the case how do we change this?
    >>>
    >>> marc
    >>>
    >>
    >> Hi Marc,
    >>
    >> I say, make your organization less browser dependent and, in that same
    >> vein, more interactive outside of the browser. Meaning, WAP, RSS, PDA
    >> friendly. Make it easy for people to trackback, ping, linkback (or
    >> whatever it is you want to call it) your content. Make it easy for
    >> others to create a web of context around your site. Will it create
    >> more
    >> hassles like comment-spam? Absolutely, that may well be the case. But
    >> the internet is not just about content, it's about people and the only
    >> way you're going to get people to commit to your message is by
    >> engaging
    >> them in a dialogue. And just getting them into your site is not
    >> enough.
    >>
    >> The web browser does not scale. With an aggregator, I can scan more
    >> than 300 sites on a daily basis. Back in the old days, I could view
    >> most of the web on a week (1995). You've just gotta make it easier for
    >> people to get to furtherfield. I mean, I rarely go to Rhizome's front
    >> door --because I have no incentive to do so. On the other hand, with
    >> Rhizome Raw, even if it does not have the activity of its hey-day it
    >> is
    >> still the most interesting thing Rhizome has to offer because it is
    >> Rhizome's social space. If I could have it on my aggregator, it would
    >> make me even happier.
    >>
    >> Furtherfield is a fabulous site with a lot of interesting stuff to
    >> look
    >> at --but I have to go to your front door to know what's new. I'm sorry
    >> but the ease of looking at more than 300 sites in under an hour will
    >> kick out any non-syndicated sites from my "Must See" list. And, no,
    >> RSS
    >> is not just a geek thing. MyYahoo! just introduced an RSS module to
    >> their services. They made email ubiquitous, I am sure that they'll do
    >> the same with RSS.
    >>
    >> So the moral of the story is: Make it easy for your potential audience
    >> to get to your content in as many ways as possible. I mean, your site
    >> is supported by the BBC. Make sure you check their web-dev process. I
    >> read their specs were floating somewhere on Kazaa.
    >>
    >> Best,
    >>
    >> l i z a
    >> =========================
    >> www.culturekitchen.com
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    > +
    > -> post: list@rhizome.org
    > -> questions: info@rhizome.org
    > -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
    > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
    > -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
    > +
    > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
    > Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
    >
  • Liza Sabater | Sat Feb 7th 2004 12:28 a.m.
    On Thursday, February 5, 2004, at 08:20 PM, marc garrett wrote:

    > Hi LIza,
    >
    > You did not answer the question its self but you certainly opened it
    > up to
    > excellent other ideas - with a genuine response which has triggered
    > off some
    > fresh cranium shifts, answering many other issues that we are in the
    > motions
    > of trying to sort out - which is pretty cool...

    [blush]

    > How much do you charge for such a quality consultation?

    by looks of my bank account not enough :)

    >
    > You've cheered me up Liza, an excellent email, much thanx :-)

    well, you're very welcome.

    l i z a
    =========================
    www.culturekitchen.com
  • Liza Sabater | Sat Feb 7th 2004 12:31 a.m.
    On Thursday, February 5, 2004, at 11:04 PM, Lee Wells wrote:

    > Hi Liza,
    >
    > I must agree with Marc.
    > I think that was one of the most concise and important things stated
    > here in
    > quite a while.
    >
    > Kudos
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Lee

    Hi Lee,

    Thanks.

    It's an issue that's been under my radar for some time.
    I'll be blogging more about this and cross-post here.
    Cheers.

    l i z a
    =========================
    www.culturekitchen.com
  • marc garrett | Mon Feb 9th 2004 6:22 a.m.
    Hi Rachel,

    I would answer this but very ill at the moment, just got back from being in
    hospital, Gastritus & Kidney problems...not much fun.

    So i'll have to refrain from getting into an argument here - time for sleep.

    marc

    >
    > I also wouldn't characterize those who aren't interested in
    > participating as being subject to nationalist preferences or
    > gate-keeping. Seems a cynical evaluation of a group of (chiefly) highly
    > intelligent, net-savvy, international, free-thinking people, and it's
    > not exactly an inviting or inclusive mode of address towards your
    > potential peers. -- Rachel
    >
    > On Feb 6, 2004, at 8:57 AM, Matthew Mascotte wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Liza-
    >>
    >> No doubt, that is the most articulate and savvy
    >> networking strategy i've seen in a long while...
    >>
    >>
    >> respects,
    >>
    >> Matthew
    >>
    >> On Thursday, February 05, 2004, at 05:12PM, liza sabater
    >> <liza@culturekitchen.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Thursday, February 5, 2004, at 03:52 PM, marc garrett wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Question?
    >>>>
    >>>> So as the mapping of Internet creativity continues are the more
    >>>> independent
    >>>> groups going to be ignored due to nationalist preferences and
    >>>> institutional
    >>>> gate-keeping?
    >>>>
    >>>> If this is the case how do we change this?
    >>>>
    >>>> marc
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Hi Marc,
    >>>
    >>> I say, make your organization less browser dependent and, in that same
    >>> vein, more interactive outside of the browser. Meaning, WAP, RSS, PDA
    >>> friendly. Make it easy for people to trackback, ping, linkback (or
    >>> whatever it is you want to call it) your content. Make it easy for
    >>> others to create a web of context around your site. Will it create
    >>> more
    >>> hassles like comment-spam? Absolutely, that may well be the case. But
    >>> the internet is not just about content, it's about people and the only
    >>> way you're going to get people to commit to your message is by
    >>> engaging
    >>> them in a dialogue. And just getting them into your site is not
    >>> enough.
    >>>
    >>> The web browser does not scale. With an aggregator, I can scan more
    >>> than 300 sites on a daily basis. Back in the old days, I could view
    >>> most of the web on a week (1995). You've just gotta make it easier for
    >>> people to get to furtherfield. I mean, I rarely go to Rhizome's front
    >>> door --because I have no incentive to do so. On the other hand, with
    >>> Rhizome Raw, even if it does not have the activity of its hey-day it
    >>> is
    >>> still the most interesting thing Rhizome has to offer because it is
    >>> Rhizome's social space. If I could have it on my aggregator, it would
    >>> make me even happier.
    >>>
    >>> Furtherfield is a fabulous site with a lot of interesting stuff to
    >>> look
    >>> at --but I have to go to your front door to know what's new. I'm sorry
    >>> but the ease of looking at more than 300 sites in under an hour will
    >>> kick out any non-syndicated sites from my "Must See" list. And, no,
    >>> RSS
    >>> is not just a geek thing. MyYahoo! just introduced an RSS module to
    >>> their services. They made email ubiquitous, I am sure that they'll do
    >>> the same with RSS.
    >>>
    >>> So the moral of the story is: Make it easy for your potential audience
    >>> to get to your content in as many ways as possible. I mean, your site
    >>> is supported by the BBC. Make sure you check their web-dev process. I
    >>> read their specs were floating somewhere on Kazaa.
    >>>
    >>> Best,
    >>>
    >>> l i z a
    >>> =========================
    >>> www.culturekitchen.com
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >> +
    >> -> post: list@rhizome.org
    >> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
    >> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
    >> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
    >> -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
    >> +
    >> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
    >> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
    >>
    >
    > +
    > -> post: list@rhizome.org
    > -> questions: info@rhizome.org
    > -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
    > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
    > -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
    > +
    > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
    > Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
    >
  • chris webb | Tue Feb 10th 2004 9:30 p.m.
    The critique on the furtherfield site is amusing - you've done Jakob Nielsen proud.
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