Rhizome Press

Help preserve feminist video gaming history

Boing Boing | Tuesday, December 16th 2014

But the games business' particular fixation on newness and "innovation" mustn't divorce us from our obligation to history -- that's what makes Rhizome's work with Duncan's oeuvre more important now than ever.


The Quest to Resurrect Three of the 90s' Most Important CD-ROM Games for Girls

Motherboard/Vice | Tuesday, December 16th 2014

In the early 1990s, when the most popular CD-ROM game for girls was Barbie Fashion Designer—which outsold Quake in 1992—Chop Suey, Smarty, and Zero Zero spoke to young girls' imaginations. The games were screwy, wonderful, and visionary. In 2014, they’re something even more significant: a reminder that intelligent gaming by and for women is part of our collective digital history, as long as we remember to preserve it.


MUST WE BECOME PITILESS CENSORS OF OURSELVES?

Flaunt | Friday, December 12th 2014

GeoGoo uses the familiar interface of Google Maps (familiar to those of us naviga- tionally deficient and of a certain age—south say, of fifty) to throw the user into a tangled assault of spiraling and geometrical icons that populate and overrun various geographic locations like a cartographer’s nightmare. GeoGoo is the work of net art pioneers JODI, the winners of the inaugural Prix Net Art launched by Rhizome.


Play With History, Help Rhizome Bring Back Chop Suey

Art F City | Wednesday, December 3rd 2014

So thank you, Rhizome, for planning an exhibition into gaming’s foggy past. Part one: they’re hosting a Kickstarter to bring back Chop Suey—and two other games designed with the help of Theresa Duncan, Smarty (1996) and Zero Zero (1997)—to play in an online exhibition about feminist gaming. Part two: Duncan’s games will be free (hooray), and available on any modern browser via emulation.


Theresa Duncan's Early Video Games To Be "Virtualized" Online

Fast Company Labs | Friday, November 21st 2014

According to the Entertainment Software Association, as quoted recently by the New York Times Magazine, nearly half of all gamers are female, though the majority of employed developers are male. With more experimental, powerful, and intimate game projects like Porpentine's, and open-source game-creating platforms like Twine becoming more known, it's a good time to be reminded of Duncan's pioneering work from a decade ago is as relevant as ever.


Let's All Save These Historic Works of Feminist Game Making From Obscurity

Kill Screen | Tuesday, November 18th 2014

That's why Rhizome, a NYC-based nonprofit digital arts organization, has taken to Kickstarter to raise the funds they need to preserve these important artifacts. As Rhizome curator Michael Connor explains, their interest and investment in preserving Theresa's work is doublefold, because "they are an excellent example of the lyrical possibilities of the CD-ROM, and important, overlooked works by women—and I also want people, especially girls, to be able to explore and enjoy them again."


Social Anxiety: Why Artist Amalia Ulman's Fake "Middlebrow" Instagram Is No Different From Yours

The Fader | Friday, November 7th 2014

Other than the most recent image she posted—an Instagram advisory she received about not posting photos that are against the app's "Terms of Service," with the caption "Glad @rhizomedotorg archived it all"—she gives no indication that @amaliaulman is a conceptual art piece.


Rhizome Announces First Prix Net Art Award Winners

New York Observer | Thursday, October 30th 2014

Rhizome has named artist duo JODI the inaugural winner of its Prix Net Art award, which comes with a cash prize of $10,000. A $5,000 Award of Distinction has also been given to Kari Altmann.


New Rhizome tool preserves net art for future generations

Dazed | Thursday, October 23rd 2014

The non-profit arts organisation was concerned that online art could disappear at the whims of its host site or went through a dramatic redesign (think Friendster or Myspace). Colloq works by replicating the basic interface of apps such as Instagram with a few modifications – you can't, for instance, scroll past the first image of the piece.


The Many Uses of Rhizome’s New Social Media Preservation Tool

Hyperallergic | Tuesday, October 21st 2014

How do you capture and preserve the experience of a new media artwork created on Twitter in 2010? How do you re-create the design and feel of Twitter’s interface at that time, and populate that interface with users’ contemporaneous profile photos? These are the types of questions that New York’s digital art nonprofit Rhizome is trying to answer in the development of Colloq, a new conservation tool that will help artists preserve social media projects not only by archiving them, but by replicating the exact look and layout of the sites used, and the interactions with other users.


A Dynamic New Tool to Preserve the Friendsters of the Future

New York Times | Sunday, October 19th 2014

What makes the Internet special is the ability to delve into the details or follow odd little side roads. On Facebook, that might mean a detour to see the wedding photos of a long-lost friend, or read a heartfelt essay on the death of a parent, or follow the public conversations on topics like the Ebola virus. Right now, there’s no way to preserve that kind of complex, immersive experience. But Rhizome, a New York nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and conserving digital artwork, is trying to build a new kind of data recorder to do just that.


App’s a Bust But It Doesn’t Dampen Spirits At Miranda July Event

New York Times | Friday, October 10th 2014

[Miranda July's] app, Somebody, is a human messaging service akin to a singing telegram. Users compose a note (often with stage directions) to a friend and send it off via cellphone. Another Somebody user, usually a stranger, delivers the message in person. The New Museum is one of several art institutions across the country that signed on as an official hotspot for the app. Ms. July’s discussion was part of the New Museum’s and Rhizome’s joint First Look series, which showcase original new work created for the web, through newmuseum.org and rhizome.org.


Virtual family man: Ed Fornieles, artist and former boyfriend of Felicity Jones on 'post-internet' art

London Evening Standard | Thursday, August 21st 2014

Last year, at the über-trendy New Museum in New York, he put on NY NY HP HP, a performance-cum-charity gala, in which attendees were given specific roles to be played out over the evening — it eventually descended into a pillow fight and mock orgy.


Competitive Web Surfing: A Journey to the Center of the Internet

Gawker | Tuesday, August 12th 2014

Trailblazers—which began in Stuttgart, Germany, in 2010, and made its stateside debut this week—asks competitors to get from point A to point B, across the vastness of the internet, using only the inline links embedded in websites to navigate. With no keyboard, we couldn't access the URL bar or search engines, and the browser we used wasn't outfitted with modern luxuries like bookmarks or a back button. We were to surf the web manually, site by site, click by click.


I got destroyed at a web-surfing competition

The Verge | Tuesday, August 12th 2014

I knew the web surfing contest was going to be hard as soon as Dragan Espenschied, a digital conservator and artist, explained the premise. Race across the internet from point A to B using only a one-button mouse: no keyboard, no search, no URL bar, no back button. It sounded almost impossible, even for someone who spends all day online, and that was before I found out my competitors had been training.